Stylish frames for spectacles frame


Thumbnail viewList view

235 of 235 showing

  • Gender & ageView allWomen's (159)Men's (125)Children's (7)
  • TypeView allFormal wear (8)Fashionable wear (39)Everyday/work wear (14)Outerwear (1)Underwear (10)Sleepwear (2)Pregnancy (5)Mourning (4)Formal accessory (15)Fashionable accessory (161)Everyday accessory (34)Prints & paintings (25)
  • Geography all American Britain England France Spain Italy Germany China Mediterranean area

No objects found with this filter.

  • Purse or "Sweet Bag"
    1600
  • Drawstring Bag
    1600
  • Rectangular Canvaswork Purse
    1600
  • Man's Glove with Pink Cuff
    1610
  • Gold Knitted Glove
    1610
  • "La Galerie du Palais"
    1640
  • White Linen Collar or "Falling Band"
    1640
  • Garters
    1649
  • Stocking or Long Purse
    1650

    This purse is made in an ancient technique called sprang, in which threads are stretched on a frame and manipulated with the fingers to interlink or twine them, working from the ends toward the middle, and often using a stick to control the twists and keep them from unraveling. The resulting fabric has natural elasticity, similar to knitted products, although the techniques are very different.

    Acc. Num: 1971-1421

    container,adult,genderf,genderm,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pre-1675,1675-1710,1710-1740,
  • Green Woven Purse with Ribbon Fringe
    1650
  • Woman's Mule or Slipper
    1660
  • Pocket Watch
    1665
  • Workbag
    1675

    Women used workbags to carry their knitting, sewing, and knotting supplies in the home or when they went out visiting. Crewel wool embroidery using one color was fashionable from about 1650 to 1700. Unlike multicolor embroidered textiles, single-colored designs were outlined and filled in with veining or dots instead of shading. Although this example is English, Americans embroidered in this style: Samuel Sewall of Boston ordered fustian (a cotton and linen textile similar to this workbag) and green wool for an embroidery project for his daughters in 1687.

    Acc. Num: 2009-12

    container,adult,genderf,evydyacc,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,pre-1675,1675-1710,
  • Les Details de l'Habillement du Courtisan
    1678
  • Walking Stick
    1680
  • "Constantinople" Pocketbook
    1696
  • Man's Gloves
    1700
  • Man's Undress Cap
    1700
  • Woman's or Man's Pocketbook
    1700
  • Cream-color Kerchief
    1700
  • Peach Kerchief
    1700
  • Shield-Shaped Purse
    1700
  • Spectacles or "Pince-Nez" Glasses with Tinted Lenses
    1700
  • Spectacles with Case
    1700
  • Knitted White Cap
    1700
  • Green Embroidered Cap
    1700
  • Silk and Metallic Embroidered Purse
    1700
  • Fan
    1700
  • Woman's White Mitts
    1700
  • Green and Pink Ribbons
    1700
  • Infant's Shirt (top)
    1700
  • Undress Cap
    1700
  • Lace Edging
    1700
  • Apron (missing waistband), made by or for Jane Riggs
    1710
  • Stomacher with Crossed Cords (front and back)
    1720
  • Stomacher (front and back)
    1720
  • Garter
    1725
  • "Tetuan" Pocketbook, shown with paper backing visible
    1727
  • Woman's Shoes
    1730
  • Apron
    1730
  • Shield-Shaped Purse, front and back
    1730
  • White Embroidered Cap
    1730
  • Red Embroidered Cap
    1730
  • Lace Edging
    1730
  • Apron
    1730
  • Fan
    1730
  • Boy's Waistcoat
    1730

    This child's white embroidered waistcoat was made from a larger one sized to fit a man. The boy's waistcoat was cut down around the edges, interrupting the embroidery design without regard for its original contours. The pocket flaps were repositioned directly on top of the densest portion of needlework. In unaltered examples, flaps were usually stitched within a blank area framed by the embroidery design.

    Acc. Num: G1971-1577

    fshn,adult,genderm,child,waistcoat,clothing,1710-1740,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • The Brewster Family of Wrentham Hall, Suffolk; Thomas Bardwell
    1736

    The posture, clothing, and accessories of the members of this gentry family signal high status, a leisurely lifestyle, and awareness of the latest fashions. The 24-year-old heir, Philip, sits at far left wearing a full powdered wig that makes him appear older than his actual age. His suit coat has deep cuffs and full skirts. His pose seems calculated to display a waistcoat that is embellished with embroidery or brocading. The women and girls, including the widow in black and white clothing, have gowns with cuffed sleeves and cone-shaped bodices with high bust lines. The girl holding a cat was ten years old at the time the painting was done. Her youth is indicated by her gown that fastens at the back.

    Acc. Num: G1971-3374

    clothing,accessory,fshn,fashnacc,adult,genderf,genderm,mourning,child,pandps,1710-1740,
  • Dress Textile
    1736
  • Woman's Pocket
    1737
  • Gown
    1740
  • Sleeve Ruffles
    1740
  • Apron
    1740
  • Fan
    1740
  • Stock
    1740
  • Yellow Shoes with Braid Trim
    1740
  • Yellow Brocaded Shoes and Buckles
    1740
  • Lace Cap Lappets
    1740
  • Lace Cap Lappet
    1740
  • Earrings
    1740
  • Watch with Chatelaine (Henry Fish)
    1740

    Chatelaines were brooches or hooks suspended from the waist with pendants of useful implements, such as household keys, thimble cases, seals, watches, and the like. This chatelaine includes a watch, a watch key for winding the watch, and two seals for stamping the wax seal of a letter. The word chatelaine came to mean the mistress of a household.

    Acc. Num: 1952-601

    adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,jewelry,watch,1740-1750,
  • Fan: "Battle of Porto Bello"
    1740
  • Unmade Sleeve Ruffle
    1740
  • Gown
    1740
  • "Battle of Portobello" Fan
    1740

    Fans often celebrated current events, such as the 1739 Battle of Portobello, an acclaimed British victory over the Spanish in Panama. This fan is also a good pictorial source for everyday clothing. Some of the sailors depicted on this fan wear jackets and short trousers typical of workingmen's clothing. Trousers of the eighteenth century were loose, comfortable pants that ranged from knee- to ankle-length.

    Acc. Num: 1981-195

    accessory,evrydy,adult,genderf,genderm,fashnacc,fan,trousers,jacket,
  • Cap
    1740
  • Breeches
    1740
  • Fan: "Cartagena"
    1741
  • Miniature Portrait of William Gooch
    1742

    As the engraved inscription around the miniature indicates, William Gooch died in 1742 at the age of 27. The miniature portrait was painted after his death as a memorial, possibly copying a larger portrait of him. As the only son of Virginia's royal governor, Sir William Gooch, and his wife, young William lived in the Williamsburg Governor's Palace.

    Acc. Num: 2000-39

    clothing,pandps,adult,genderf,genderm,fashnacc,accessory,mourning,jewelry,miniature,1740-1750,america,
  • "Taste in High Life"
    1742
  • Formal Gown
    1745

    Despite remodeling that is especially evident in the piecing of the sack back, this gown has superlative beauty. The heavily embellished gold stomacher and gilt brocading threads glitter in the light. Wavy lines of applied trim add extra pattern to the already lavish skirt front. The petticoat, or skirt worn beneath the outer gown, is made of a different silk textile, possibly because the original petticoat was cut up for the remodeling.

    Acc. Num: 1968-646, 1-3

    clothing,frml,genderf,adult,gown,petticoat,stomacher,1740-1750,1770-1785,
  • "May" from the Months of the Year
    1745
  • Shoe Buckles
    1745
  • Man's Pocketbook
    1749
  • Mannequin
    1750

    From 1760 to 1780, women's gowns had closely-fitted bodices, sleeves that usually ended just below the elbows, and full skirts. The gown was only a small part of the look, however. Delicate and expensive white accessories, such as kerchiefs, aprons, and sleeve ruffles could dress up a plain dark gown. Shoes and stockings protected the feet, but also allowed the wearer to show off the latest fashion in the shape of the toe or the height of the heel. Removable shoe buckles changed the appearance of a pair of shoes while also serving to fasten the shoes in place.

    Acc. Num: n/a

    clothing,genderf,adult,accessory,fashnacc,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Mannequin
    1750
  • Spectacles
    1750
  • Necklace and Earrings with original case
    1750

    Although they may look like diamonds, less expensive paste stones set in silver created a brilliant effect in this matching set of necklace and earrings for pierced ears. The necklace has loops at the ends for ribbons to tie around the neck. The box has padded interior wells for housing the three matching pieces of jewelry when not worn.

    Acc. Num: 1960-878, 1-3

    metallic,genderf,fmlacc,accessory,jewelry,earrings,necklace,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Stocking Purse
    1750
  • Two Buttons for Coat and Waistcoat
    1750
  • Pointed Oval Knee Buckles
    1750
  • Walking Stick
    1750
  • Walking Stick
    1750
  • Stockings, Possibly Women's
    1750

    These stockings were knitted as flat pieces using stocking frames operated by male workmen. The foot or sole sections were knitted separately. The two pieces making up each stocking were then sewn together by female workers. Decorative areas at the ankles, called clocks, were either put in during the knitting process, as in these two examples, or embroidered after the stocking was taken off the frame.

    The stocking frame was invented in 1589 by Englishman William Lee. Although professionally frame-knit stockings were available for purchase, many housewives knit their family's stockings by hand using knitting needles.

    Acc. Num: 1975-182, 1

    clothing,adult,genderf,genderm,underwear,fashnacc,accessory,stockings,hose,1750-1770,
  • Stockings, Possibly Women's
    1750

    These stockings were knitted as flat pieces using stocking frames operated by male workmen. The foot or sole sections were knitted separately. The two pieces making up each stocking were then sewn together by female workers. Decorative areas at the ankles, called clocks, were either put in during the knitting process, as in these two examples, or embroidered after the stocking was taken off the frame.

    The stocking frame was invented in 1589 by Englishman William Lee. Although professionally frame-knit stockings were available for purchase, many housewives knit their family's stockings by hand using knitting needles.

    Acc. Num: 1954-1051, 1

    clothing,adult,genderf,genderm,underwear,fashnacc,accessory,stockings,hose,1750-1770,
  • Sleeve Buttons (Cuff Links)
    1750
  • Brooch
    1750
  • Sleeve Ruffles; Button-on Sleeve Ruffles
    1750
  • Banyan and Matching Waistcoat
    1750

    Although banyans were styled to be loose and comfortable, they were nevertheless worn with a full set of clothing underneath, including shirt, breeches, and waistcoat. This banyan has a sleeveless waistcoat made of matching fabric.

    Old pleats at the front are evidence that this banyan was remade from a woman's sack-back gown. Men's clothing usually differed in pattern from women's gowns. Except for embroidered formal wear, most suits were made with solid, striped, or small-patterned textiles. Only loose banyans such as this were considered suitable for large-scale damasks or brocaded silks.

    Acc. Num: 1941-208, 1-2

    clothing,evrydy,adult,genderm,banyan,waistcoat,1750-1770,
  • Man's Cocked Hat
    1750
  • Women's or Men's Stockings
    1750

    The finest stockings were knitted of silk and decorated at the ankles with clocks, decorative embroidery or knitted-in designs. These knitted stockings were made on a stocking frame, or knitting machine, as two flat pieces. The curved edges of the larger piece were later joined by hand to form a center-back leg seam. The sole was a separate smaller piece that was sewn into the foot.

    Acc. Num: 1975-182, 1-2

    clothing,accessory,fshn,adult,genderf,genderm,fashnacc,stockings,1740-1750,1750-1770,
  • Gown and Petticoat
    1755
  • Gown and Petticoat
    1755

    Chinese artisans made textiles specifically for export to Europe and America. With its intricate hand-painted floral design and silver outlines, this textile would have been a luxury item. Styled as a robe à la française (in England, known as a sack), the back has pleats at the shoulders that release into a graceful train. The mock stomacher buttons down the front. The skirt and petticoat originally had applied ruffles or flounces, perhaps removed to update the gown.

    Acc. Num: 1993-330, a-b

    clothing,frml,fashionable,genderf,adult,gown,petticoat,1770-1785,
  • "Tetuan" Pocketbook
    1755
  • Quilted Petticoat
    1755

    This petticoat features diamonds filled with a variety of motifs, including flowers, fish, birds, and other animals; it is dated 1755 in the quilting and signed by an unknown woman whose initials were S. W. Although ready-made quilted petticoats were imported, some girls and women quilted their own petticoats at home. Many of them used imported materials, such as the silk in this example.

    Acc. Num: 1994-88

    clothing,fshn,adult,genderf,america,petticoat,1750-1770,
  • Hat
    1760
  • Apron
    1760
  • Woman's Workbag
    1760

    This clever workbag incorporates four compartments for needlework and knitting supplies: a small compartment at the top with flip-up lid, a drawer that pulls out from the side, a drop-down semicircular compartment with pincushion sides, and a drawstring bag with interior channels for holding knitting needles in place. The rigid structure appears to be made of paperboard and trade cards. The words "A. King's Dover Street" can be read through the thin silk. This probably refers to the as-yet unidentified milliner who made the bag.

    Acc. Num: 1960-730

    metallic,adult,genderf,evydyacc,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Pocketbook with Lock of Hair
    1760
  • Man's Breeches to a Three-Piece Suit
    1760

    Men's breeches, or knee-length pants, had a number of fasteners. This pair has a tab at the back for adjusting the waist size with a buckle (the buckle is missing). Other breeches had eyelets and laces for this purpose. Where the buttons were hidden by the waistcoat, or vest, they are covered with fabric. Because the lower legs and knees were more visible, elaborate silver plate and silver bullion buttons fastened the side knee openings. The band below the knees, sometimes called a garter, was buckled tightly to help hold the stockings up and keep the breeches firmly in place as the man moved. Knee buckles were removable; they had a special T-shaped fitting to allow them to be slipped in place through a buttonhole stitched in the knee band.

    Acc. Num: 1992-37, 3

    clothing,adult,genderm,fshn,breeches,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Stock Buckle
    1760
  • Stock Buckle
    1760
  • Sleeve Ruffle
    1760
  • Stays
    1760
  • Suit Coat, Waistcoat, and Breeches
    1760

    According to family history, a twentieth-century customer gave this suit to his tailor to settle an unpaid bill. Said to be worn by "a Virginia gentleman," the suit is made of spotted silk velvet.

    Acc. Num: 1992-37, 1-3

    clothing,fshn,adult,genderm,america,coat,waistcoat,breeches,suit,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Stock Buckle
    1760
  • Suit Coat, Waistcoat, and Breeches
    1760
  • Gown
    1760

    The serpentine, or meandering, lines in this brocaded silk are typical of 1760s design. The gown was later remodeled with the plunging neckline, edge-to-edge front closure, and S-curve silhouette that became popular after 1785.

    Acc. Num: 1985-144

    clothing,accessory,fshn,adult,genderf,fashnacc,apron,gown,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Apron
    1760
  • Miniature Portrait of a Member of the Fauquier Family, used as Bracelet
    1761
  • "The Studious Fair (possibly Queen Charlotte)"
    1761
  • Coat
    1765
  • Wig Stands
    1765
  • Shoe and Knee Buckles with Case
    1768

    A paper inscription glued to the bottom of the buckle case states that Philip and Maria Van Rensselaer wore these buckles at their wedding about 1770 (it actually occurred in 1768) and that their descendants, J. Glen and Pearl Green Sanders, wore them when they married in 1922. The silk lining on the box is inscribed with the name Eliza Van Rensselaer. Eliza, or Elizabeth (1771-1798), was the daughter of Philip and Maria.

    Acc. Num: 1964-297, 1-4

    fashnacc,buckles,wedding,adult,accessory,genderf,genderm,1750-1770,1770-1785,america,
  • Walking Stick
    1769
  • Formal Suit
    1770
  • Shoes
    1770
  • Handkerchief, Hunting Song, R. Davids
    1770

    This handkerchief features a scene of fox hunting in the British countryside. Can you find the fox?

    A popular period stylish frames for spectacles frame hunting song is printed around the edges. A handkerchief similar to this design was worn by John Cockil, an English convict servant and barber who ran away from his Fredericksburg, Virginia, master in 1772. The March 19, 1772, Virginia Gazette newspaper states that the runaway was wearing "a red and white Handkerchief round his Neck, with a hunting Song round the Borders of it."

    The verses around the edges of the handkerchief read:

    Away to the Copse to the Copse lead away,
    and now my Boys throw off ye Hounds.
    I'll warrant he shews us he shews us some Play,
    See Yonder he skulks thro the Grounds.
    Then spur ye brisk Coursers & smoke e'm my Bloods
    'tis a delicate scent lying Morn.
    What Concert is equal to those of the Woods,
    betwixt Eccho ye Hounds & ye Horn.
    Each Earth see he try's at in vain,
    The Cover no safer can find.
    So he breaks it and scowers amain,
    And leave's us at distance behind.
    O'er Rocks and o'er Rivers and Hedges we fly,
    All Hazard and Danger we scorn,
    Stout Reynard we'll follow untill that he die.
    Cheer up the Good Dogs with the Horn.
    And now he scarce creeps thro' the Dale,
    All parch'd from his Mouth hangs his Tongue,
    His speed can no longer prevail
    Nor his Life can his cunning prolong,
    From our staunch & fleet Pack 'twas in vain that he fled,
    See his Brush falls bemir'd forlorn,
    The Farmers with Pleasure behold him lie dead
    And shout to the sound of the Horn.

    Acc. Num: 1966-19

    adult,genderf,genderm,evydyacc,accessory,handkerchief,1770-1785,used in America,
  • Rectangular Buckles with Openwork
    1770
  • "The Englishman in Paris"
    1770

    A sturdy Englishman endures the torture of having his wig powdered by a dandified French barber-hairdresser. The gentleman wears an apron to protect his clothing from stray powder.

    Besides constructing hairpieces, wigmakers styled men and women's hair and shaved gentlemen. During the first three-quarters of the eighteenth century, most fashionable men shaved their heads and donned wigs, considered indispensable fashion accessories. Toward the end of the century, wigs gradually went out of fashion. Men began to wear their own hair, which they had styled and powdered for dressy occasions. Although few women wore wigs, some added extra curls to their own hair.

    Acc. Num: 1940-174

    clothing,accessory,fshn,adult,genderm,pandps,evrydy,evydyacc,fashnacc,wig,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Collar Made from Sleeve Ruffles
    1770
  • Pudding Cap
    1770
  • Banyan
    1770
  • Petticoat
    1770

    The striped petticoat is woven with linen warps and wool wefts. Unlike that of typical garment construction methods, the fabric here is used horizontally with the warps running around the body, not up and down. Originally discovered in Connecticut, the petticoat may be the work of a New England weaver. Similar textiles were also produced in Kendal, England.

    Acc. Num: 1991-444

    clothing,evrydy,adult,genderf,america,petticoat,1770-1785,1785-1795,1795-1815,1815-1840,
  • Man's Pink Waistcoat
    1770
  • Man's Cream Waistcoat
    1770
  • Frock Coat
    1770
  • "Lady Fashion's Secretary's Office, or Peticoat Recommendation the Best"
    1772
  • "Wigs"
    1773
  • Handkerchief, "Claiming the Gammon of Bacon"
    1774

    The English village of Dunmow in Essex had a long-standing tradition in which a married couple that had remained faithful and happy for a year could claim a "gammon" of bacon. A gammon was the lower end of a side of bacon or a smoked ham. The custom has been revived in the town of Dunmow in modern times, and is still scheduled every four years.

    The verse on the handkerchief reads:

    FORM OF THE OATH
    You shall Swear by the custom of our confession
    That you never made any Nuptial transgression,
    Since you were Married Man and Wife,
    By household brawls or contentious strife;
    Or otherwise, in Bed, or at Board,
    Offended each other in Deed, or in word;
    Or since the Parish-Clerk said Amen,
    Wished yourselves Unmarried again;
    Or in a Twelvemonths and a Day,
    Repented not in thought any way;
    But continued true, and in desire,
    As when you joined hands in holy quire.
    If to these Conditions, without any fear,
    Of your own accord you will freely swear;
    A Gammon of Bacon you shall receive,
    And bear it hence with love, and good leave;
    For this our custom, at Dunmow well known,
    Tho the sport is ours, the Bacon's your own.

    Acc. Num: 1967-102

    adult,genderf,genderm,evydyacc,accessory,handkerchief,1770-1785,
  • The Man of Business
    1774
  • Shoe Buckles
    1775
  • Handkerchief, "The Right Hon.ble John Wilkes, Esq.r"
    1775

    John Wilkes (1725-1797) was a controversial British political figure and a member of parliament who became known for his defense of the rights of ordinary citizens. In the mid 1770s, he defended the cause of the American colonies. A handkerchief such as this would have been a popular accessory, not only for the citizens of London who shared Wilkes' political views, but also for Americans.

    Wilkes holds the Magna Charta, the 1215 document that guaranteed greater rights to English citizens. Wilkes steps on papers labeled "General Warrants." This alludes to the 1763 search and arrest warrants that were issued against Wilkes and the others involved in a newspaper that Wilkes had used to criticize the administration. The handkerchief also refers to the questionable legality of general, broad-based warrants, which lacked specifics about the alleged crime.

    Acc. Num: 1951-447

    adult,genderf,genderm,evydyacc,accessory,handkerchief,1770-1785,used in America,
  • Shoe Buckles
    1775
  • Spectacles with Case
    1775
  • Cream and Blue Shoe
    1775
  • Shoe Buckles with Case
    1775
  • Black Shoe
    1775
  • Man's Pink Waistcoat
    1775
  • Short Gown
    1775

    For physical labor and very informal occasions, women wore loose short gowns with separate petticoats as comfortable alternatives to tight-fitting gowns with long, full skirts. Short gowns were relatively inexpensive, as they required a minimum of fabric. The printed cotton added pattern and color to an everyday garment.

    This rare garment is exceptionally fragile. The iron in the mordant used for the printing has caused some colors to darken to brown and to etch through the cotton. The brown colors were probably purple when the gown was new.

    The neckline and back shoulders have stitched casings and drawstrings to provide some fit to the otherwise-unshaped garment. The gown is of small size and may have been worn by a girl.

    Acc. Num: 1985-242

    evrydy,gown,clothing,adult,genderf,child,1775-1785,1785-1795,1795-1815,
  • Apron
    1776
  • Man's Wallet and Notebook
    1777
  • "Buckles and Buttons"
    1777
  • "The Old Maids Morning Visit or the Calash Lady's"
    1777
  • Benjamin Franklin
    1777

    Through his personality and wearing apparel, Benjamin Franklin helped to create the belief that Americans were individualistic, freedom-loving, and immune to royal trappings. Especially in his later years, Franklin became known for his distinctive appearance, including spectacles, a fur cap, and long hair, which he wore down instead of drawn back in a queue. Franklin appeared at the court of France's Louis XVI in 1778 without the wig that was customary formal dress. He wore a suit of plain dark velvet and no sword, causing an observer to comment, "I should have taken him for a big farmer, so great was his contrast with the other diplomats, who were all powdered, in full dress, and splashed all over with gold and ribbons."

    Acc. Num: 1959-82

    clothing,accessory,evrydy,america,adult,genderm,fashnacc,spectacles,pandps,1770-1785,
  • Formal or Court Gown
    1780

    This gown is a dramatic example of a time lag in formal clothing. Although the wide skirt was typical of mid-18th-century styles, the deep point at this gown's back waist indicates a date in the 1780s. The crisp silk textile is dotted with metallic silver threads woven from selvage to selvage, a type of fabric called "silver tissue."

    Acc. Num: 1953-849, 1-2

    clothing,frml,genderf,adult,gown,petticoat,1770-1785,1785-1795,
  • Shoe Buckles
    1780
  • Handkerchief, "The Game of the Goose"
    1780

    Women frequently carried handkerchiefs in their large tie-on pockets. During the 18th century, handkerchiefs were made of plain white linen or printed textiles, sometimes depicting a scene or sentiment. This handkerchief was also used as a game board and rules for the "Game of the Goose," which was played by throwing a pair of dice. Each player rolled the dice and added the two numbers together, advancing that number of positions on the game surface. If a player landed in one of the special locations, such as the Ale House, Well, or Prison, he or she had to abide by the rules for that location. For example, anyone landing on the Death square had to pay a penalty and start over. The player who reached 63 first without going over won the game.

    The Game of the Goose
    ------------Rules--------------
    1st This Game is playd with a pair of Dice and any Number of persons
    may play at it. 2nd Whatever Number it is that any one throws that person must place
    his Counter in the White space under the same Number, for Example, should the Cast be 6&3 he
    must place the Counter at 9, if the Cast be 6&5 he must place it at 11 & when he throws again he must add the
    Number to that where his Counter lyes and so [remove] accordingly. 3rd He that throws 6 must pay a Stake
    for his passage over the Bridge and go to Number 12. 4th He that throws a Goose must double his Cast for-
    ward from his Cast place. 5 He that throws 19 where the Ale House is must pay a Stake & Drink
    till his turn comes to throw again. 6 He that throws 31 where the Well is must stay there till every
    one has thrown twice unless some One else throws the same & then he must return to that persons
    place. 7th He that throws 42 where the Maze is must pay a Stake and return back to the num-
    ber 29. 8th He that goeth to 52 where the Prison is must pay one and stay there a prisoner
    till some One relieves him by throwing the same Number. 9th He that [seeth] to 58 where
    Death is must pay One and begin again. 10th He that is overtaken by another must return to
    His place that overtook him & both must pay a stake. 11 He that overthroweth the
    Number 63 must return back and begin as at first.----------------
    12th He that throweth the just Number 63 Winneth the Game.

    Acc. Num: 1961-129

    adult,genderf,genderm,evydyacc,accessory,handkerchief,1785-1795,
  • Pocketbook with Comb, Folding Knives and Nail File, Lead Holder, and Writing Tablet
    1780

    Fitted interior compartments house the functional but beautiful implements inside: a tortoiseshell comb, mother-of-pearl folding knife and file, an ivory writing tablet, and a lead pencil for making notes.

    The pocketbook hints at puzzling questions. The gold outer clasp appears to date to the late 18th century, based on its style and an analysis of the metal. The interior clasp, knife, and nail file date after 1860. Because the interior enamel clasp is backed by the pink lining, the lining must also date after 1860. Did someone remodel and reline a late 18th century purse in the 1860s or 1870s? Was the purse completely remade in the 19th century using parts from several older purses? For what occasion did someone create such a beautiful assemblage of materials?

    Acc. Num: 1952-341

    container,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,pocketbook,purse,1770-1785,post-1840,
  • Rectangular Buckle with Rounded Corners
    1780
  • Clergyman's or Barrister's Stock with Short Bands
    1780
  • Clergyman's or Barrister's Stock with Short Bands
    1780
  • Kerchief
    1780

    Throughout the 18th century, women wore triangles or folded squares of fabric over the shoulders and around their necks for warmth, modesty, and decoration. These accessories were known as kerchiefs, or neck handkerchiefs. In the 19th century, similar garments were called fichus. In the 1780s, fashionable kerchiefs were large and worn puffed out over the chest. This kerchief is marked SL in tiny cross stitches, the initials of the unknown wearer.

    Acc. Num: 1985-131

    clothing,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,kerchief,fichu,1770-1785,1785-1795,
  • Pink Work Bag or Purse
    1780
  • Cream Work Bag or Purse
    1780
  • "The Spruce Sportsman, or Beauty the Best Shot"
    1780
  • Green Calash (Collapsible Bonnet)
    1780
  • Black Calash (Collapsible Bonnet)
    1780
  • Maternity Ensemble
    1780

    This ensemble consists of a jacket, petticoat, and a vest worn under the jacket. The sleeveless vest, which has adjustable lacings at the center back, expands the waist size for use during pregnancy. The jacket can also be worn without the vest.

    Acc. Num: 1936-666, 1-3

    clothing,pregnancy,maternity,nursing,adult,genderf,jacket,petticoat,1770-1785,1785-1795,
  • "A Journeyman Parson with a Bare Existence"
    1780
  • Breeches
    1780
  • Woman's Jacket
    1780
  • Unmade Waistcoat
    1780
  • Stockings
    1782

    According to a paper document that came with the stockings, they were hand knitted by Catherine Jansen Wistar (1703-1786), probably for her daughter Sarah Wistar, whose initials SW are cross-stitched on the stockings. The Wistars were Quakers from Philadelphia. Women continued hand-knitting stockings, even though professionally frame-knitted stockings were also being produced. If the family tradition is correct, these stockings were knitted about the time the Revolutionary War was ending when imported goods were still scarce.

    Acc. Num: 2009-43, 4 a-b

    clothing,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,underwear,stockings,hose,1770-1785,american,
  • Infant's Shirt and Sleeve Buttons (bottom)
    1784

    This lace-trimmed shirt and cuff links have a history of use by Jane Hodge (later Mrs. Thomas Nichols) of Maine. She was born in 1784. The linked gold buttons descended in the family with the shirt, although their design appears earlier than the 1780s; they may have been handed down from a previous generation. (Seen with acc. num 1971-1570)

    Acc. Num: G1991-1180, 1-2

    child,shirt,fashnacc,fshn,jewelry,clothing,accessory,1710-1740,1740-1750,1750-1770,1770-1785,
  • Spectacles with Green Lenses
    1785
  • Mitts
    1785

    These mitts descended in a family of Philadelphia Quakers, a group conservative in their choice of clothing and accessories. For that reason, the mitts, which appear fashionable for the 1780s or 1790s, might have been used well into the 19th century.

    Acc. Num: 2009-43, 6 A-B

    clothing,adult,genderf,evydyacc,fashnacc,accessory,mitts,gloves,1785-1795,1795-1815,1815-1840,america,
  • "March" from the Months of the Year Series
    1785
  • "July" from the Months of the Year Series
    1785
  • Muff
    1785
  • Lady's Pocket Watch
    1785
  • Shoe Buckles
    1785
  • Formal or Court Coat
    1790
  • Pink Stocking Purse
    1790
  • Purple Stocking Purse
    1790
  • Shoe Buckles and Case
    1790

    The family of Virginian John Minson Galt (1744-1808) cherished his shoe buckles as mementos of the illustrious physician and patriot. A later family member relined the case and wrote the history on a piece of paper: "Shoe Buckles that belonged to my gr, gr, Grandfather, Dr. John Minson Galt, Chief surgeon Va. Military Troops during the Revolutionary War.—Alex Galt Robinson."

    Acc. Num: 1980-27, 1, A-B and 2

    adult,genderm,fashnacc,accessory,buckle,1785-1795,worn in America,
  • Rectangular Buckle with Rounded Corners and Beadlike Decoration
    1790
  • Stock Buckle
    1790
  • "Francklin" (Benjamin Franklin)
    1790
  • Fan: "The Bath Gift"
    1790
  • Spring Garter
    1790

    Garters using coiled metal springs encased in silk were invented in the 1780s. They were intended to replace earlier garters that consisted of ribbons or tapes tied tightly around the leg. Martin Van Butchell, a surgeon-dentist in England, applied for a patent for spring bands in 1783, followed closely the next year by another English inventor named Jean Philippe, who applied for a patent using tempered steel in his spring garters. By the 1840s, elastic was introduced, making spring garters obsolete.

    Acc. Num: 1985-263

    clothing,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,underwear,garter,1785-1795,1795-1815,1815-1840,
  • Shift or Nightgown
    1790

    Unlike knee-length shifts women wore beneath their gowns, this shortened style with front opening was used during the lying-in period following childbirth. The hip-length shifts would be easier than longer ones to keep stain-free during the mother's recuperation from childbirth. They were also more comfortable and convenient for sitting up in bed to receive company. Stitch marks indicate that the shift originally had a drawstring under the bust. This shift has a tradition of ownership by Ann Van Cortlandt Van Rensselaer of Albany, New York. Although Van Rensselaer did not have any living children, one can speculate that she had prepared a set of clothing in anticipation of childbirth after her 1787 marriage to Philip Van Rensselaer. Perhaps she became pregnant, but the child miscarried. That she never had the opportunity to use the clothes may account for their survival.

    Acc. Num: G1990-6

    clothing,pregnancy,nursing,underwear,sleepwear,adult,genderf,america,1785-1795,1795-1815,shift,nightgown,missing,
  • Banyan with Attached Waistcoat Fronts
    1790
  • Stock Buckle
    1790
  • Waistcoat
    1790
  • Breeches
    1790
  • "Frying Sprats" (Satire of Queen Charlotte),
    1791
  • Mannequin
    1795
  • Bound Almanac with Needle Case and Mirror: The Polite Repository, or Pocket Companion
    1795

    Bound in one small volume is a calendar with pages for noting appointments, pages for cash accounts, and useful information for a well-born London woman, including lists of the members of Parliament, the baronets of England, princes of Europe, historical kings and queens of England, London bankers, school terms, and weights and measures. The owner of this almanac noted that she had two visitors on May 2 and 5 (Saturday and Tuesday) and attended parties on May 13 and 14 (Wednesday and Thursday) and the following week on May 18 and 19 (Monday and Tuesday). The book also includes slots for storing sewing and writing implements, wool leaves for holding needles and pins, and a mirror.

    Acc. Num: 1993-115

    container,adult,genderf,fashnacc,evydyacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,1785-1795,
  • Oval Knee Buckles
    1795
  • Stock
    1795
  • "Compliance"
    1796
  • Formal or Court Suit
    1800

    Combining brilliant color, elegant materials, and heavy metallic embroidery, this suit epitomizes the richness of men's European court wear in the early 19th century. The silhouette is attenuated, with slim skirts and a high collar that reaches almost to the ears. In contrast to earlier suits of the mid-18th century, shoulders are more square and broad. The shape of the coat, which curves away from the body, hints at the cutaway coat that becomes the standard for men's formal dress into the 21st century.

    Acc. Num: 1941-215, 1-3

    clothing,frml,genderm,adult,coat,waistcoat,breeches,1795-1815,1815-1840,
  • Miniature Portrait in Pendant: "Woman, Possibly Mrs. James Gignilliat"
    1800
  • Shawl
    1800
  • Stockings, Probably for a Man
    1800
  • Pocketbook with Valentines
    1800

    This folding pocketbook is embroidered on the outside as well as on all six interior compartments with flowers and baskets in silk and metallic threads. Still inside the pocketbook are hand-painted and embroidered cards received or intended as Valentines. The sentiments, written in French, talk about honoring the recipients and sending greetings from the heart. One of the cards is stitched with silk through paper in a reversible embroidery technique; the front and back are equally finished. The greeting is addressed to the embroiderer's "Cher papa" (dear father) and sends her love.

    Acc. Num: 1971-1420

    container,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,1795-1815,1815-1840,
  • Mail or Post Bag
    1800
  • Bonnet or Hat
    1800
  • Gloves
    1800
  • Cap
    1800
  • Neck Ruffle or Frill
    1800
  • Neck Ruffle or Frill marked Anne Peck No. 4
    1800
  • Short Gown
    1800
  • Garter
    1800
  • "Two Women" from Gallery of Fashion Magazine
    1801
  • Waistcoat
    1801
  • Woman's Hat
    1806

    Although the style of this hat looks eighteenth century, it was made in the nineteenth century. The label glued to the crown lining identifies the maker as Philip Heitshu, son of a German immigrant to Philadelphia. After a period of time spent in Loudoun County, Virginia, Heitshu moved to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1806 and opened a hat manufactory. He retired from the business in 1827. If a wearer is old-fashioned or thrifty, his or her clothes might date much later than stylistic features would suggest.

    Acc. Num: 1992-227

    clothing,accessory,adult,genderf,america,fashnacc,hat,1795-1815,1815-1840,missing,
  • Purse, Sally Henry
    1809
  • Shoes
    1810
  • Livery Coat and Waistcoat
    1810
  • Trousers
    1810

    Men's long trousers began to enter high fashion during the late eighteenth century. Prior to that time, only laborers, sailors, and young boys wore long pants. The conversion to the new mode was gradual. By 1830, however, most men had adopted long pants for daily wear. Only formal suits, such as those worn at court, continued to have knee-length breeches into the middle of the nineteenth century.

    Acc. Num: 1999-215

    clothing,fshn,adult,genderm,america,trousers,1795-1815,1815-1840,
  • Mourning Brooch
    1811
  • Mannequin
    1815
  • Mannequin
    1815
  • Neck Ruffle or Frill
    1815
  • Man's Pocketbook with Letters
    1815

    According to the family history stitched to the inside of this folding pocketbook, a schoolgirl attending classes in Litchfield, Connecticut, made this pocketbook for her father, Asahel Bradley of Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The Litchfield Female Academy, founded in 1792, taught girls from around the country. The curriculum included needlework and watercolor painting, as well as academic subjects.

    Mr. Bradley must have cherished the pocketbook for many years. It is stuffed with letters, mementos, newspaper clippings, and poetry dating from 1830 to 1856. Several of the letters refer to the death of Bradley's two young grandsons in 1832.

    The pocketbook is embellished with hand-done wool needlework covering a linen canvas ground. Called in the period "Irish stitch," the needlework involved vertical stitches on the surface of the canvas, stepping over three or four squares of the canvas at a time, often in a zig-zag pattern. Today the work is sometimes called "Florentine, bargello, or flame stitch."

    Acc. Num: 1991-492

    container,adult,genderm,evydyacc,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,1815-1840,american,
  • Neck Ruffle on Dickie
    1815
  • Barrister's Wig and Box
    1817

    For symbolic reasons, British barristers continue to wear 18th-century style wigs hundreds of years after wigs have ceased to be worn as fashion. By the date of this wig, fashionable men were wearing their own hair, not wigs. W. H. Griffith, Esquire, whose name is painted on the wig's tin box, was Walter Hussey Griffith of Ireland. He was born in 1794 and became a barrister in 1817. He was still practicing in Dublin in 1850, when he appeared in the city directory with an office at 13 Clare Street. His son Walter Downes Griffith also became a barrister, as did his grandson, named Walter Hussey Griffith after his grandfather.

    Acc. Num: 2008-118, A-B

    adult,genderm,evrydynacc,accessory,wig,1815-1840,
  • Bag with Music
    1820
  • Cream Stocking Purse with Multicolor Embroidery
    1820
  • Cap
    1820
  • Muff
    1825
  • Case with Mirror, Miniature Writing, and Packaged Needles
    1825

    This case is fitted with a mirror inside, not unlike a makeup mirror or compact of today. Inside the case is a package of three tiny needles wrapped in a paper folder; the needles were manufactured in Philadelphia. One of the early owners left examples of her miniature writing inside the case. The Lord's Prayer ("Our Father") is written on a piece of paper less than one inch square. A three-verse song entitled "The Wood Robin," written on paper 1 5/8 by 2 1/8 inches, was taken from a book published in Philadelphia by John Grigg. First published in 1826, his songbook entitled Southern and Western Songster was enlarged and republished in 1836. The text of the song reads as follows:

    The Wood Robin

    Stay sweet enchanter of the grove
    Leave not so soon thy native tree
    But warble still thou notes of love
    While my fond heart responds to thee
    [Indented] But warble still &c
    [singer was to repeat last two lines of song]

    Rest thy soft bosom on the Spray
    Till chilly Autumn frowns severe
    Then cheer me with thy parting Lay
    And I will answer with a tear
    [Indented] And I will answer &c

    But soon as Spring enrich'd with flowers
    Comes dancing oer the new-dress'd plain
    Return and cheer thy Natal bowers
    My Robin with those notes againv [Indented] Return and cheer thy natal

    Acc. Num: 1971-1468

    container,adult,genderf,fashnacc,accessory,purse,pocketbook,1815-1840,american,
  • Stenciled Apron
    1825
  • Nursing Dress
    1825
  • Shoes
    1828
  • Flower Basket Purse
    1830
  • Stocking
    1830
  • Collar or Pelerine
    1830
  • Dress
    1835
  • Green Stocking Purse
    1840
  • Handkerchief, "The Century of Invention Anno Domini 2000"
    1841
  • Formal or Court Suit: Coat and Breeches
    1850

    By the middle of the 19th century, men's court suits followed a formula: dark wool cloth trimmed with shiny buttons, like these cut-steel examples, and embroidered waistcoats. Styled like a fashionable suit of 80 years earlier, this coat has a center-back vent and pleats trimmed with buttons at the top and peeking out from inside the folds.

    Acc. Num: 1957-39, 1-2

    clothing,frml,genderm,adult,coat,breeches,1815-1840,post 1840,
  • "The Proposal"
    1855



Related news


Bangalore fashion blog
Fashion designer rapper song
Moda dos cintas fino's plano
Drukarnia poezji 1920's fashion
What does fashion designers wears
Australia's fashion in the 1950s
High fashion models tumblr flowers
Patronaje y moda asignaturas de sociologia