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"2013? I'm sick of hearing about 2013! If it's supposed to be 2013, how come I'm stuck driving this old beater instead of a flying car, eh? And why am I still wearing this threadbare old suit? Couldn't you give me something more dashing?"

Shunsaku Ban (to Osamu Tezuka), Astro Boy

The first uses of the year 2010 surged late in the 20th century as a 20 Minutes into the Future date as the year 2000 was getting closer, apart from looking for something more original. The word "New" is used to distinguish the 2010s from the 1910s — arguably unnecessary since there are few people alive who remember The Edwardian Era (the current oldest living person as of 2018 was 7 when King Edward died,and just 11 when WWI began, and the oldest-known living Brit was 6).

The decade began in the West with young, cosmopolitan and progressive leaders being voted to replace the folksy, "gut feeling"-centered and conventional politicians that marked the 2000s. Their modernizing ambitions however ended up colliding with the realities brought upon by the economic downturn of 2005-10 and the Pyrrhic outcome of The War on Terror, which led to a widespread climate of distrust towards the establishment, embodied by the surge of populist movements both on the left and the right, gradually leading to a level of political confrontation not seen in decades.

Social reforms (primarily regarding same-sex marriage) met with fierce criticism from people who did not ask for them as well from those who felt short-changed. "Homegrown terrorism" became increasingly common, with politicians engaging into an endless debate about a response. The loss of economic certainty following the 2008-09 financial crisis led to calls for wider welfare provisions as well as the return of high-paying manufacturing jobs. A number of controversies regarding digital piracy and net neutrality generated more suspicion over the relationship between political and corporate interests, and the uncovering of the National Security Agency led to concerns about surveillance. Cases of police brutality against blacks, anti-immigration policies, and "hate crimes" against minorities reduced faith on law and order among these groups. Feminism returned to prominence as the "gender gap" became a major source of concern, and later in the decade a series of sex scandals shone light over the position of women in society.

In the Arab world, the death of Osama Bin Laden in 2011 did not end Islamic extremism. The Arab Spring, which began as a pro-democracy protest movement, soon gave way to chaos and civil war. Many rebel groups sprang up (with those fighting the Syrian government being supported by the West) and began occupying territories that fell into anarchy after the U.S. pulled out of Iraq. Before long, the militant Islamic State had not only spread over numerous Arab countries, but also became infamous for taking hostages and beheading them. Their deeds also led to a massive exodus from those countries towards Europe and North America, the migrant crisis generated even more tensions, with anti-Muslim sentiments gaining traction over fears that terrorists were trying to break through.

The East saw an increased influence over global affairs: China (and to a lesser extent, India) largely avoided the Great Recession, becoming economic powerhouses. Russia recovered some of its Cold War-era power (becoming decisive over the Syrian conflict, among other things), and North Korea had the world worrying about a nuclear conflict with the West. In cultural terms, Japan's place as the continent's cultural and economic powerhouse became disputed by South Korea.

For the first time in over 70 or 80 years, the political and economic climate has impacted the socio-cultural in an inescapable fashionnote This particular "decade page" is unique (along with the 30s and 40s) for listing politics before culture, becoming more watered-down and risk-averse compared to the "alternative" trends of the late 90s and 2000s, with an important focus on political correctness in society. While the early years of the decade were marked by such escapist fare such as Glee, the Marvel Cinematic Universe films, young adult-geared romantic dramas and "shiny reboots", sordid settings and cynical attitudes that thrived in media, reflecting the turbulent sign of the times. Dystopian societies (The Hunger Games, The Last of Us, Divergent) dominated fiction set in the future, dark cable dramas (Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, Breaking Bad) took away the spotlight from broadcast network shows, a number of franchises got acclaimed grim-and-gritty interpretations in the vein of The Dark Knight trilogy, and horror films served as allegories (The Purge). Even nostalgia got an ironic twist thanks to the Hipster subculture, ironically popularizing the past like never before. As the social climate became even more tense by the second half of the decade, escapism not only became totally unfashionable outside of kid-geared works, but also triggered a raging debate about works becoming either too politicized or not political enough.

As traditional gender conventions became questioned, male roles began emphasizing "softer" personalities while female characters became more feminine and empowered. Similarly, LGBT characters began popping up in fiction and a number of celebrities came out to little controversy, whereas all this had been an extremely touchy subject just one decade earlier.

After almost a half-century defining popular music, rock vanished from the mainstream, being replaced by Electronic Dance Music and hip-hop as pop radio became increasingly centered on affluent urban, non-white and female audiences. The beginning of the decade also marked the revival of the "musical heartthrob" phenomenon — but, this time, American acts took a backseat to those coming from Great Britain, whose culture became popular again as it gained a reputation as being highly sophisticated relative to more lowbrow North American counterparts. During the second half of the decade, Hispanic "Reggaeton" and Korean "K Pop" acts became popular around the world after years of unabated dominance of their home bases.

While globalization became more and more politically unpopular, entertainment in general became more internationalized (a notorious example being the influence of the Chinese market in film), something attributable to the rise of mobile technology, which allowed anyone to keep "in touch" anywhere, absorbing social lives to a degree unimaginable ten years earlier. This has allowed "selfies" and "memes" to spread worldwide instantly. From a commercial point of view, online advertising has encouraged some authors to prioritize the work over the earnings, and developing closer relationships with their fanbases. Content-wise, this has also led to a substantial increase in creative freedom compared to the increased scrutiny in the mainstream, a development made visible by the explosion of streaming services with series such as House of Cards, Orange Is the New Black, Stranger Things and The Handmaid's Tale becoming huge hits. The success of apps like Uber and Airbnb led to hopes about the rise of the "collaborative economy" while Amazon was thought to become an eventual "panacea" for the cares of the consumer. By the second half of the decade however, technological optimism gave way to skepticism (in the best of cases) as tech giants were blamed for the tribulations of numerous trades and social media was now seen as a soapbox of sorts for scurrilous information and social engineering.

In political terms, the decade began between 2008 and 2012, with the collapse of Lehman Brothers (2008), Barack Obama's first inauguration (2009), the first UK coalition government since WWII, the rise of WikiLeaks, the American Tea Party, the British UKIP, the Spaniard "Indignados" and the BP oil spill (2010). "Occupy Wall Street", the Arab Spring, the death of Osama bin Laden, Anonymous, the first American government shutdown since the 1990s the Tucson and Oslo massacres (2011), the formation of ISIS, and Obama's re-election (2012) all followed shortly after. In popular culture terms, the decade began in 2010-12 with the rise of Hipster culture, which coincided with rock being replaced by electronic and urban music as the driving force of pop music, as well as the time smartphones and tablets became commonplace and Netflix surged as a major player, kickstarting the streaming business.

Check out the Useful Notes page for more details on notable aspects of this era thus far.

See Also: The Roaring '20s, The Great Depression, The '40s, The '50s, The '60s, The '70s, The '80s, The '90s, and Turn of the Millennium, and The Millennium Age of Animation.

Tropes associated with the 2010s:

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    Tropes 

  • '50s Hair: Elegantly-coiffed "Teddy Boy" hairstyles styled with retro products like pomade (themselves based on late 19th/early 20th century styles) have made a comeback among men in reaction to the unkempt "skater look" of the late 1990s and 2000s.
  • '70s Hair: Returned to popularity among men both at the beginning and the end of the decade. The shaggy haircuts of Justin Bieber and One Direction and other carryovers from the aughts were popular among teenagers during the early 2010s. Longer hairstyles got a boost later in the decade as the "New Wave" undercuts became associated with the alt-right and white nationalists. The hipster subculture has also made beards and mustaches fashionable again.
  • The '80s: The nostalgia craze of the mid-2000s turned into a full-fledged revival early in the decade, getting to the point of blurring any considerable differences between both decades. Shows set in the 1980s like Stranger Things and The Goldbergs as well as movies (such as Kung Fury and Turbo Kid) and video games (Undertale and Hotline Miami) with an undeniable 80s inspired aesthetic have become popular with certain crowds. Even though it had been overshadowed by '90s/early '00s nostalgia in the second half of the decade, there's still an undeniable sense of '80s nostalgia nonetheless.
  • '80s Hair: Returned with a vengeance by 2013-14, after being the Butt-Monkey of hairdos for many years. At least, big hair and New Wave undercuts. note It is quite debatable if Jon Snow wears a mullet or not, You were still very unlikely to see mullets on someone who's not a middle aged biker, a Butch Lesbian, or both. Big curly bangs/fringes and scrunchies have also yet to make a comeback, and while mini side ponies are back, tying all hair on one side of the head is not.
  • The '90s: The 1990s are no longer regarded as the latte-overdosed downbeat years everyone thought of in the 2000s, and the decade itself has a very vocal fanbase on the net (mainly consisting of those whose formative childhood years were spent in that decade), the late 90s being particularly remembered as a peaceful time before 9/11 and the War on Terror and later on the Great Recession. Grunge has seen a resurgence among the "indie" subculture, "Golden Age" urban music has been rediscovered by shows like Fresh Off the Boat and the film Dope, and the Lighter and Softer "Cool Britannia" has regained some of its coolness. Not to mention that some furry toys caused a holiday craze once in 2013.
    • Disney is once more extremely trendy after having Regrown The Beard near the end of the previous decade. The fact that many of the new movies hearkens back to the style of movies they created in the 90's (or the 70's, even the 50's) hasn't been missed.
    • The 90s have practically come back for Eastern Europe and Central Asia - specifically Russia, essentially all other post-Soviet states except perhaps the Baltic states and most especially the former Yugoslavia - except for the fact that this decade was anything but a fun time for them. And while Russia seems determined to climb back to the status of the former USSR by any and all means (and doing quite well, for good or ill), the Baltic states and former Warsaw Pact states such as Poland and the Czech Republic have been doing comparatively well since the EU enlargement and the Balkans have somewhat recovered... but for Ukraine, Moldova and especially the former Soviet republics of Central Asia (with the exception of Kazakhstan), things have been only getting worse and worse.
  • Action Girl: Though this idea has been growing since the 80's, the decade where the film Aliens established Ripley as a female action hero and which gave rise to the video game franchise Metroid, this is the decade where character type as a viable lead in the mainstream became the most widespread.
    • The idea of women as action heroes had been dented in the 2000s by the failures of Catwoman and Elektra, and it was thought that the best a woman could hope for was to be the love interest with a Designated Girl Fight. Female-led action films such as Snow White and the Huntsman, The Hunger Games, Divergent, and Lucy proved to be significant hits and the Star Wars sequel trilogy made its lead protagonist a woman. On television, the likes of Once Upon a Time, Jessica Jones, Agent Carter, The Legend of Korra, and Supergirl all were very female-driven and enjoyed success. In the realm of video games, the Tomb Raider reboot, Horizon Zero Dawn, and Alien: Isolation featured female protagonists that greatly downplayed any fanservice while emphasizing their skills and character arcs. This culminated in the Wonder Woman movie finally leaving Development Hell and being released to widespread acclaim in 2017.
    • In professional wrestling, this was also more pronounced. After years of being held back or suffering Chickification, WWE's women were allowed to finally wrestle properly — enjoying more time, high profile feuds and more exposure than ever before. Even before WWE got in on the trend, independent promotions like SHIMMER and WSU enjoyed a boom with the rise of the internet — allowing them to reach a wider audience that did want to see serious women's wrestling.
  • Adorkable: It is almost unheard of in fiction from this decade for manly men and other types of badass characters and/or powerful people to be lionized. The majority of popular people (whether real or not) who are seen as role models in this decade are often the embodiment of this trope; known as "softboy" to their fans and "Soy Boy" to their detractors. The users of Tumblr have a knack for gathering all of their idols' adorkable character traits into a nine or ten-piece photoset to share with other fans around the world. The term "sapiosexual" (attraction towards intellectualism) has been coined during the decade.
  • Affluent Ascetic: The rampant consumerism of the 2000s gave way to frugalism in the aftermath of the 2008 crisis, with younger generations in particular ditching name brands in favor of generic "private-label" products. Trends in the property market have shifted from the palace-like "McMansions" in the suburbs to more efficiency-driven inner-city "smart-homes".
  • All-CGI Cartoon: Major animation studios still prefer these to traditionally animated films. Disney is the key exception since 2009, but neither The Princess and the Frog or Winnie-the-Pooh were as popular as all-CGI films, and their original plans to release a 2D film every other year died when 2013's Frozen was switched from 2D to CGI. Ironically, however, they have been working to create CG technology that accurately produces a traditional 2D appearance. The Paperman short for instance is a combination of CG and 2D animation. It also was a critically-acclaimed short that won multiple awards.
  • Ambiguous Gender: Gender conventions became heavily questioned in the mainstream, with many openly defying them, most notably by the rise of dyeing among men and women shaving their heads partially or fully. Fashion designers have also put "gender-neutral" outfits on the runways.
  • Anti-Hero: Mean-spirited (if not totally evil) leads became more prominent in TV thanks to the popularity of Walter White, Tyrion Lannister, Rick Grimes, Don Draper, Frank Underwood, and Nucky Thompson among others. Sadly, James Gandolfini, the actor behind TV's first big anti-hero, passed away in 2013. This trope is getting more popular in anime as well thanks to characters like Accelerator and Lelouch.
  • Archer Archetype: Became more prominent in many media thanks to characters like Link, Daryl Dixon, Oliver Queen and Katniss Everdeen, among others.
  • Archive Binge: invoked The popularity of online streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu have actually led to shows regaining a second life. In fact, several shows have become exclusive to online avenues, with some even getting Un-Cancelled. This effect gave Breaking Bad a huge surge in popularity before its final season, going from cult hit to cultural juggernaut. All the existing episodes were available on Netflix when it swept the Emmys meanwhile the final season was being filmed, so people who heard about it could check out the first episodes, get hooked, watch all the episodes, tell some friends to watch it and then tell all their friends to do the same...
  • Ascended Meme: Considering how much closer creators and fandom are now (primarily on web-based content), this is becoming common.
  • Author Existence Failure: 2016 was rather infamous or probably notorious for this trope (especially because other "cataclysmic" events that happened over the year), with many famous celebrities like David Bowie, Alan Rickman, Prince, Muhammad Ali, Yuko Mizutani, and Gene Wilder dying within that year, along with George Michael, Carrie Fisher and her mother Debbie Reynolds in late December. This parody trailer depicts 2016 as a serial killer in a Slasher Movie.
    • In terms of how deaths in the 2010s affected future works: Heath Ledger's death in 2008 prevented his Joker from reappearing in 2012's The Dark Knight Rises, Leonard Nimoy's in 2015 forced rewrites for Star Trek Beyond that would allow them to write around his absencenote Nimoy as Old Spock was given a proper death and sendoff at the beginning of the film; both received memoriams in the credits, and while Carrie Fisher's death did not affect The Last Jedi (as all her parts were already filmed), it will affect Episode IX, as she was planned to be the main "original trio" that the film focused on note following Han in The Force Awakens and Luke in The Last Jedi.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Crop-tops have become commonplace to the point that bare midriff is no longer considered edgy or scandalous, even in more conservative "modest" crowds; most female models and musicians rock this look. A common variant has emerged, almost as if in a trade-off, that while the midriff is exposed, the navel area is often fully (or at least, partially) covered.
  • Basement-Dweller: Many works have shown young people being forced to move back with their parents (either playing this trope straight or subverting it), unable to go ahead in a post-Great Recession economy. The trope name has also been used as an online slur.
  • Big, Fat Future: The obesity epidemic hitting developed countries is truly beginning to take hold; plentiful, high-calorie food is making everyone go up a few pant sizes and stories portraying futures full of overweight people are beginning to emerge because of this.
  • Big Ol' Eyebrows: For the first time since the '80s, thick eyebrows are fashionable for people of all genders. Many women are trying to obtain fuller, darker brows opposed to tweezing. Unlike in the '80s however, the ideal eyebrows must be highly groomed and sculpted to an angular shape, similar to a common '60s look. Popular sex symbol Cara Delevingne has had a significant influence on this trend. Well-groomed thick eyebrows were even given a slang in the African-American community: "on fleek" became a relatively widely-used idiom.
  • Bishōnen: This trope, along with sports anime and manga, is getting more popular among North American anime fans thanks to tsuritama, Free!, K, and Haikyuu!!.
  • Boy Band: They are baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaack! But unlike the late-90's wave, only One Direction has become notoriously successful; the rest of this new generation of boy bands have generally been minimally popular, like The Wanted and Big Time Rush. The only other boy band besides 1D to have any reasonable success this decade has been the Australian pop-rock group 5 Seconds of Summer, their opening act on their second and third world tours.
  • Boyish Short Hair: In the West, 60s-inspired hairstyles became popular early in the decade (in particular the "pixie" variety), while partially- or fully-shaven heads gradually became mainstream throughout the decade, first among the African-American community before extending to women of all ethnicities.
  • Breakaway Pop Hit: After the soundtrack hit had become irrelevant since the late 1990s, it made a huge comeback in 2012 with "(The Theme From) Skyfall" (joined by the positive reception "Cups" and "Suddenly" got that same year)note To add context, there were just two nominees for the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2011, while 2012 saw five participants for the first time since 2004, helped by rule changes.. By the middle of the decade, these became increasingly ubiquitous, with "Happy", "Let It Go", "Boom Clap", "The Hanging Tree", "Love Me Like You Do", "Earned It", "See You Again", "Can't Stop The Feeling", "Remember Me" and "This Is Me" among others becoming very successful since then.
  • British Brevity: Cable and streaming series have shunned the traditional 22-to-26-episodes-a-year "American season" in favor of the more flexible "British system" of 6 to 13 episodes, seasons not necessarily adjusting to a yearly schedule, making it easier to "binge-watch".
  • Buffy Speak: Becomes increasingly common in this decade; many popular Millennial slang phrases use intentionally vague language for humorous effect. Notable examples include "Because reasons" (i.e. "For reasons I don't feel like explaining"), "Because fuck you, that's why" (i.e. "For illogical reasons"), and "That's a thing" (i.e. "That exists" or "That's a recognized phenomenon").
  • Bury Your Gays: This trope became mostly discredited in fiction after the avalanche of LGBT characters being killed off sparked a major backlash in 2015/2016.
  • But Not Too White: Gradually becoming a Discredited Trope. Thanks in part to an increased awareness of skin cancer and a resurgence of heavy makeup, tans are no longer seen as a prerequisite for beauty, as demonstrated by the likes of Christina Hendricks, Robert Pattinson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Dita Von Teese, and Katy Perry. As demonstrated by the rapid fall of Jersey Shore (and others), excessive tanning is now far more likely to be mocked than swooned over. Tanning has also gained backlash due to the awareness of color-ism and appropriation; people who continue to artificially bronze themselves, such as the Kardashians, have been accused of putting on Brownface.
  • Capitalism Is Bad: The creation of publications that openly denounced capitalism, such as the Jacobin and Current Affairs magazines and podcasts such as Chapo Trap House that blended humor with left-wing politics, accompanied the resurgence of socialism in the anglosphere. At the same time, science-fiction and dystopian media, such as Black Mirror and Sorry to Bother You, increasingly critiqued what was known as "Late Capitalism" and its impact on society.
  • Career Versus Family: Younger people's penchant for overachievement has made them delay any prospects of forming families, if not reconsidering them altogether.
    • In addition, many millennials entered the job market during the Great Recession and were forced into part-time or minimum-wage jobs which did not allow for the sense of stability that would encourage starting a family.
  • Cassette Futurism: Vinyl records and cassette tapes have made a comeback in this decade even alongside digital technology.
  • China Takes Over the World: In the first half of the decade China battled with the U.S. for economic primacy. See also the entry for Make the Bear Angry Again. However, this has thawed or cooled down in wake of looming problems for the Chinese economy predicted by economists such as Paul Krugman and the resurgence of the US from the Great Recession. However, China has been making aggressive territorial claims in South China Sea and Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands, rapid military buildup, and threatening war with nearby neighbors (Taiwan and Japan in particular).
  • Continuity Reboot: Several franchises have seen remakes and reboots during this decade. Some were successful, but many others have been critical and commercial failures, especially those of which only had their last installment less than a decade previously. Many have called this trend a sign that Hollywood has run out of ideas.
  • Cool Big Sis: This trope is increasingly popular in pop culture media alongside with Plucky Girl. Specifically in the anime medium where the Little Sister Heroine character archetype gotten a lot of backlash which led to criticism of this trope from top anime directors and producers (i.e. Yoshiyuki Tomino), which led to a meme of "Age of Onee-san."
  • Cool Old Guy: Along with Cool Old Lady. Celebrities over 80 years of age have become wildly popular with younger people, including George Takei, Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart (all three outspoken progressives [especially Takei] who worked on Star Trek, the former two (who are also openly gay) in lead roles; McKellen and Stewart are also famous for the X-Men [both] and The Lord of the Rings [McKellen] film series), as well as Betty White, Angela Lansbury and Dick Van Dyke (for their endearing naiveté and impressive longevitynote Although Lansbury's reputation was briefly clouded by some declarations over #MeToo) among others. And in an era of near-absolute distrust towards politiciansnote President Donald Trump (72) is very unpopular among those under 45 given his arch-conservative policies, while his main election opponent Hillary Clinton is very controversial among those under 30, although she is somewhat the less hated of the two, younger people have become particularly enthusiastic supporters of septuagenarian progressive figures such as Bernie Sanders, Jeremy Corbyn and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, while former U.S. V.P. Joe Biden stands out among the rest.
  • Cosmic Horror Story:
    • H.P. Lovecraft is enjoying a revival in reputation. It was in this decade that a huge collection of his work was made into an anthology by the Library of America (more or less announcing that Lovecraft, and horror fiction by extension, is now part of the canon of great literature). Likewise, a number of Lovecraft inspired fiction and horror has seeped into mainstream works. Ridley Scott's Prometheus and Alien: Covenant made the cosmic horror subtext of the original Alien series into text.
    • The first season of the highly popular True Detective drew inspiration from Film Noir as well as New Weird works by Lovecraft and Thomas Ligotti to articulate a pessimistic cosmic view of the universe, as a random mistake that is not comprehensible to human imagination. The popular Dark Souls games as well as Bloodborne and the sci-fi franchise Mass Effect also drew heavily on Lovecraftian concepts to articulate a less heroic and more terrifying approach to the RPG genre.
    • Lovecraft Lite tropes that lean heavily on cosmic horror have also become popular, with the highly popular [adult swim] series, Rick and Morty more or less submitting Back to the Future and Doctor Who style optimistic sci-fi adventure to a Deconstructive Parody by showing that a Mad Scientist Eccentric Mentor with physics-rewriting abilities would more or less have Blue and Orange Morality as a result of daily confronting mindbending threats from outer space every week or so.
  • Dance Sensation:
    • Every year has had one:
      • The "Dougie" of 2010;
      • The Party Rock "Shuffle" of 2011;
      • The Gangnam Style of 2012;
      • The Harlem Shake and later twerking of 2013;
      • For 2014, we've seen the Jive Turkey-influenced "Happy Walk", the Real Women Have Curves empowered "All About That Bass", and the Shmoney Dance;
      • For 2015, we've watched Silentó Whip and Nae Nae, iHeartMemphis Hit the Quan, and Drake bopping the Hotline Bling;
      • For 2016, we've seen the "Running Man Challenge", the Trumpets Dance, "Juju On That Beat", and the "Pen-Pineapple-Apple-Pen" (and the "Black Beatles" Mannequin Challenge, though it's not exactly a dance).
      • In 2017, we've seen a craze over Latin dancing and "Beep Beep, Imma Sheep."
      • In 2018, we saw Momoland singing "Bboom Bboom", and Drake expressing "In My Feelings" outside his running car, a dancing alien in El Chombo's Dame tu Cosita, and the Fortnite dances.
    • Although it's considered a dance fitness program, Zumba, with its upbeat and spicy choreography influencing from street dancing, hip-hop and Latin ballroom dance, spread explosively to every gym throughout the world.
  • The Dandy: The man sharply dressed with tight clothes, bright pastel colors (with a pair of Nerd Glasses) revived throughout the decade.
  • Darker and Edgier: A popular trend with many media reboots, and many works aimed at younger audiences featured teen heroes in dystopian societies. The trend may have been kicked off by the The Dark Knight Trilogy, Christopher Nolan’s mature and dark take on the Batman franchise.
  • Dark-Skinned Blond: Blond or pastel hair is becoming especially popular with women of color, especially bleached buzzcuts.
  • Deep South: With a new cultural focus on racial issues, a number of pro-Reconstruction historiography castigating the Lost Cause has entered the mainstream, as in the case of films like Lincoln, 12 Years a Slave and also Django Unchained, all taking place in a more negative version of this setting.
  • Disaster Movie: After falling out of favor for almost a decade (because of September 11th and Katrina), the genre has seen a significant revival. Movies of the genre also tend to overlap strongly with Survival Horror. The genre also saw multiple parodies, most notably with Sharknado, which fully embraces its cheese factor with a ridiculous premise too absurd to take seriously.
  • Dogged Nice Guy: Use of this trope in fiction has shifted towards deconstructions and subversions. Expect any stereotypical example (or any character who repeats the once-accepted wisdom that "girls only like assholes, not nice guys like us") to be portrayed as an emotionally-abusive, misogynistic creep with entitlement issues.
  • Dye Hard: Hair-dying has become extremely popular during the decade. Trends include ombre hair, "galaxy" hair, and "mermaid" hair.
  • Dystopia: The first half of the decade was full of teen-oriented works featuring dystopian settings with young protagonists rebelling against an oppressive regime.
  • The End of the World as We Know It: A radio host predicted The Rapture was going to happen on May 21, 2011, which obviously did not happen. There were also predictions that the world could end on December 21, 2012 due to changes in the Mayan calendar, and that did not happen either. And with North America's brutal 2013-14 winter (not to mention the following one as well), there were whispers of Ragnarok.
  • Environmental Narrative Game: This subgenre of Adventure Games first emerged in the previous decade, but exploded in popularity in this one with the release of critically-acclaimed and commercially-successful independent titles like Dear Esther, Gone Home and The Stanley Parable.
  • Everything's Better with Princesses: Disney Princesses are back, baby! Though they were absent for the previous decade, and subject to quite a few Deconstructive Parodies in the meantime, they made a triumphant return with The Princess and the Frog, Tangled and Frozen. While Frog ultimately failed to save Disney's traditional 2D-animated movies, Tangled sparked a huge resurgence of interest in their "Princess" franchise, and the phenomenal success of Frozen proved that the franchise is here to stay. The critical and commercial success of Moana - which did not downplay the princess or female-led aspect of the film solidified it.
  • Everything Is An Ipod In The Future: The aesthetics of this decade tend to be more eye-catching without the Design Student's Orgasm and Wall of Text coming around. The skeuomorphism of the late 90s and early 2000s had morphed into a futuristic, yet still glossy interface following the success of Apple's candylike icons and Windows 7's Aero in 2007-2009, then shifted to a more crisp and dual/triple-toned minimalist interface around 2012-2013 with Microsoft's Metro UI and iOS 7 inspiring simplistic yet informational looks. Even Google modified its iconic logo, "flattening" it (in 2013) and stripping its serifs (in 2015) for a cleaner look.
  • Feminist Fantasy: This decade saw an emphasis on female protagonists being portrayed as strong, something previously limited to "unwomanly" characters. Television was a real promised land for this subgenre — Once Upon a Time, iZombie, Jessica Jones, Agent Carter, Orphan Black and Supergirl all proving to be popular hits. Film caught on eventually, Disney especially introducing really strong feminist themes into Frozen, Maleficent and Moana. Strong female heroes including Furiosa, Rey, Jyn Erso, Wonder Woman, Valkyrie, and Shuri and Nakia absolutely dominated science fiction, fantasy, and superhero films, all of which have long been criticized for male-heavy casts. The website The Mary Sue was even established to cover all these types of things.
  • For Happiness: The millennial and "iGen" generations have been noted for their near-obsessive pursuit for perpetual bliss (or at least self-gratification), especially considering Gen-Xers' well-known dourness. While many consider this is quite justified, there has been also criticism regarding potential issues (even psychological) that this might bring sooner or later, especially among those in the centennial generation.
  • Foreign Culture Fetish:
    • British culture (primarily music, fashion, literature and TV shows like Doctor Who, Sherlock and Downton Abbey) once again became popular around the world during David Cameron's premiership, particularly among young Americans, although this seemed to vanish in the later years of the decade.
    • While not as prominent in the mainstream as it was in the last decade, German and Scandinavian culture still enjoys a loyal following not limited to metalheads—Nordic minimalism (particularly the "hygge" current) has defined the lifestyle trends of the decade.
    • In regards to Eastern culture, Japan has seen in South Korea a credible contender in the battle for gaining the favor of Western audiences as "doramas" and the urban-inspired K-pop genre has exploded in popularity, as well as electronics. The Land of the Rising Sun still has the upper hand when it comes to video games, manga, and anime. The cuisine of both countries is considered sophisticated.
    • The mutual admiration between Hispanic and black culture has intensified during the decade, a broad "Latin craze" surfacing in 2016-17 with Mexican cuisine gaining popularity and Spanish-language songs and acts becoming successful in the mainstream charts.
  • Friending Network: Facebook, Instagram and Twitter skyrocketed in popularity during the decade. Social networks founded during this time have catered more to specific interests such as Snapchat, Tumblr, Pinterest, and Vine, among many others.
  • Full-Circle Revolution: What the Arab Spring ultimately resulted in, as many Arab states have either collapsed into a civil war note Syria, Yemen, and Libya or had authoritarian governments replaced with another authoritarian government. This was the case for the latter with Egypt where, after Mubarak, a secular and authoritarian president, was overthrown, he was replaced with Mohamed Morsi, a controversial Egyptian president who had strong ties with the Muslim Brotherhood and wanted to implement Islamic laws in Egypt. Morsi was later overthrown by the military and was replaced with another secular, yet authoritarian president. The only Arab country that managed to completely avert this trope is Tunisia, as various government and social reforms had made the country a bit more democratic (albeit flawed) to the point that Freedom House increased its rating from "not free" to "free" within the span of 5 years after the Arab Spring (see the other wiki on this).
  • Full Motion Video: After being considered dead for a decade, the genre has made a small scale comeback in the middle of the decade with titles such as Her Story, Tex Murphy: Tesla Effect and The Bunker.
  • Gaming and Sports Anime and Manga: While sports-related anime and manga has historically sold poorly in America, the popularity of Free!, along with Haikyuu!! and Kuroko Basketball in America has helped revived the interest in sports anime and manga again among the American fanbase.
  • The Generation Gap: The second half of the decade has seen a chasm between conservative "baby boomers" and succeeding generations notoriously more liberal in social issues. Some works have acknowledged the gap, yet these often also point out that "boomers" weren't always that conservative, and younger people are liable to abandon liberalism once they grow up.
  • Genre Anthology: Has become popular again thanks to American Horror Story. It was quickly followed by shows like True Detective and Fargo.
  • Genre Throwback:
    • Music of the decade has been primarily influenced by 1980s-era music, as well as 90s-era R&B (hip-hop, urban pop) and 60s-era pop and "mod" music. Actually, "sunshine pop" (a generic term for upbeat, lighter pop) has consisted in borrowing from musical styles from other eras, such as its 1960s-era namesake genre as well as funk and even disco.
    • YA literature from the middle of the decade has been noted for hearkening back to 1980s-era "teen films", some of them being adapted for the screen.
  • Girliness Upgrade: After two decades of ridiculously-sexualized, borderline uncouth women, embodied in the 2000s by such trends as pop punk, rockabilly, emo, crunk and "dirty south" hip hop, hard Eurodance, funk-rock, spray tans, earthy "bohemian-chic" and campy fashions, hard-partying socialites and hot pink, this decade has seen a return towards more traditionally-feminine archetypes (although now shown as liberated, rather than vulnerable) symbolized by empowered "sex symbols" and role models, the "Instagram generation" of supermodels, rosy pink, matte, vintage glamour, sophisticated electronic music, titillating trap songs, red lipstick, and so on.
  • Golden Mean Fallacy: A much discussed and mocked trope in this decade.
    • Bioshock Infinite provoked much criticism for its in-game dialogue arguing that Daisy Fitzroy, who is both a black former slave and a quasi-anarchist rebel, is Not So Different from the dictatorial Zachary Comstock who runs Columbia, a white-supremacist city in the skies that runs on exploitation and apartheid levels of segregation. This was slammed by multiple critics such as {Errant Signal} and the backlash was bad enough that developers had to put in a Retcon in the DLC that made Fitzroy a sympathetic character.
    • Comics writer Nick Spencer got into much trouble for his online comments and his satirical reflections in his Secret Empire and other works, for using this trope as a kind of allegory for real-world political baggage.
  • Granola Girl:
    • Health-consciousness entered the mainstream after being a popular niche pursuit during the 90s and 00s, with people under 40 mostly eschewing processed foods in favor of healthier eating habits. As a result, food companies and restaurant chains began touting healthier products and organic ingredients. Beverages saw the most radical changes as bottled water and tea have given soda and coffee a run for their money.
    • "Fad diets" have become immensely popular during the second half of the decade, foods with components seen as "intoxicating" such as sugar, gluten, lactose, caffeine and white flour among others have become no longer acceptable by many people, while erstwhile "exotic" foods such as avocado, quinoa and kale have become popular. The "food-fad" trend is not without its critics, as testified by the success of the blog The Angry Chef, which even spawned a best-selling book.
    • On a non-food related note, the second half of the decade has seen a resurgence of new-age beliefs, primarily astrology, the rise of the flowing "hippie-chic" and "Boho" fashion styles inspired by Eastern designs, and an increasing awareness of environmental issues, leading to a increasing prominence of hippie-like archetypes in both fiction and real life.
  • Gray and Grey Morality: Rakish anti-heroes and not-that-evil antagonists have become particularly prominent during the decade (in case the protagonists are not as mean-spirited) as the classic set-up of stainless heroes and heartless villains has become passé.
  • Harem Genre: This genre is increasingly becoming the formula for anime, and is being widely applied to other genres as well.
  • #HashtagForLaughs: The rise of social media during the decade has taken advantage over this significant feature, along with #EngineeredHashtag, all over the Internet.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: Many works from the middle of the decade and onwards have featured the more "idealistic" characters (to put it that way) being forced to do rueful choices just to get going.
  • High Times Future: Several U.S. states have made recreational cannabis legal, with greater support for legalization among the public than ever before. In 2018, Canada became the first nation to legalize cannabis outright.
  • Hipsters: They have been everywhere during this decade (especially the first half), from cafes to music festivals and tech events to being the butt of jokes about "Hipsters are dead" (mainly because of pop culture appropriating their lifestyles). Heck, even the Neo-Nazis have jumped into the bandwagon (a viral video featured a group of "Nipsters" dancing to the tune of "Harlem Shake"... in 2014).
  • History Repeats: Many have compared this decade to many other eras, including:
    • Victorian Britain: The rise of nationalist and socialist movements only linked by their opposition to the establishment and a prim-and-proper austerity replacing the previous "devil-may-care" mindset amid a backdrop of technologic change mirror the first few years of Queen Vicky's long reign. The Arab Spring has been compared to the 1848 revolutionary movements as both attempted to topple autocrats, but ultimately made very few changes.
    • Antebellum America: The uproar over U.S. immigration authorities removing migrant children from their parents has been compared to the separation of slave children from parents, one of the issues that turned public opinion against slavery in the run-up to the Civil War. Progressives decry a Supreme Court decision on racial issues.
    • The American Civil War: An election heavily focused on race relations has the Democratic party falling in shambles due to growing divides, only unified in their belief that the Republican had to be stopped from winning at all costs. This divide ultimately costs them the election, and the Republican's rise to power practically breaks the nation in half due to mass political polarization, with much of the country unwilling to extend support to the new president, his mandate questioned due to an unspectacular popular vote performance, and several Democratic congressmen boycotting his inauguration. Subverted as there is no physical Civil War (although there has been several instances of politically and racially-motivated violence) nor has there been any secession (across from very fringe minor secession movements in California and Texas which barely get any mainstream support) while those representing the "old order" are this time the ones in charge at Washington.
      • People often compare Obama to Lincoln, as both were from Illinois (although born elsewhere), were seen as champions of civil rights, oversaw eras of heavy racial divisions, and their presidencies became sandwiched between two opposite-party presidents who are much less liked than him (a predecessor seen as inept and a successor seen as badly prejudiced). In both cases the successor is generally the more hated of the two, as both successors came into power in a very controversial manner, have been accused of white supremacist sympathies, and have faced heavy demands for impeachment (Johnson did get impeached). It helps that Obama was inaugurated about a few weeks before Lincoln’s 200th birthday anniversary.
    • The Gilded Age: A Republican candidate wins the Presidency in a controversial fashion, losing the popular vote to a Hudson Valley native, and succeeding an Illinois-born man known for enforcing civil rights. Economists Paul Krugman and Thomas Piketty have drawn comparisons between the late 19th century and the 2010s, citing the overwhelming power of big businesses and income inequality generating social tensions and the rise of "anti-establishment" politicians.
    • The Roaring '20s: The political activism and efforts for global integration of previous years becomes rejected by voters, with conservative politicians being elected en masse leaving liberal and left-wing parties struggling to cope with this new reality. The younger generations are quite cynical about the future and look up to European culture. Hollywood is hit by a sex scandal embodied (literally) by a notoriously rotund man. A devastating hurricane hits Florida. The United States establishes a strong protectionist economic policy and imposed harsh tariffs on close U.S. allies. There is concern about media not concentrating on facts and becoming too sensationalist.
      • The rise of "white nationalism" has been compared to the 1920s-era revival of the K.K.K., its infamous 1925 march in Washington, D.C. being paralleled with the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017.
    • The '30s: Worldwide economic troubles and resultant political extremism lead to a more austere worldview after a fast-paced, hedonistic decade. Strongman leaders come into power in several countries, with many an analyst becoming worried about the future of liberal democracy.
    • The '40s: A man widely expected to lose a Presidential election comes out on top.
    • The '50s: A somewhat popular actor becomes immortalized after a fatal car crash in a Porsche. A Democratic president is succeeded by a Republican candidate of German ancestry without a political background for the White Housenote Even though Ike had extensive military experience, unlike Donald, and there was much more post-Election optimism and unity for Eisenhower than for Trump in a climate of great distrust. A progressive senator from the Northeast becomes widely popular. Russia is suspected of infiltrating the U.S. government. The entertainment industry faces a crossroads with new technologies. The entertainment and academic industries come under great scrutiny from Republicans suspecting of them being outspoken proponents of left-wing thought. A Hollywood actress marries a foreign prince. A murdered black teen galvanizes the civil rights movement.
    • The '60s: Racial tensions surge after a series of highly-publicized cases of police abuse. The White House has a young Democrat in office at the beginning of the decade and a polarizing Republican at the end. People become infatuated by a Canadian PM with the surname Trudeau. There is a craze over British culture spearheaded by a particularly popular boy band, also bolstered by the presence of a telegenic, easy-going Prime Minister. British politics are affected by a sex scandal, leading to the downfall of a Government minister. There is great optimism about the future (even though expressed very differentlynote In one decade, the goal is reaching space, in the other is breaking free from oppression—and have free internet). An aging Memphis-born pop star returns to the music world after spending most of the decade in the movies. Hollywood shifts from lavish epics to more "realistic" fare during the final years of the decade, while it faces increased competition from other media. The tense political climates lead to a huge wave of protests from the political left, and subsequently the entertainment industry becomes increasingly politically outspoken. The later years of the decade see a wide generation gap between an idealistic, liberal cohort of young people and their more conservative elders. A prominent black athlete is ostracized by the American public for protesting against inequality.
      • Obama has been compared to both JFK and LBJ as time passed: Until 2011-12, he was perceived as being a youthful, telegenic President while after the debt ceiling crises (2011-13) and his re-election in 2012 he re-invented himself as a calmer, more reassuring figure at the same time he became increasingly seen as a leader willing to push his agenda to the point of risking his political legacy. Once their respective successors came into power, widespread antipathy towards the Republicans made people long for the Democrat back in office although some began pointing at them as the catalyst for what happened next.
      • The 1964 elections were compared to the ones in 2012 as both Barry Goldwater and Mitt Romney were perceived to be too conservative and too hostile to foreign allies, while the Democratic administration managed to paint the previous (moderate) Republican administration as conservative by linking them to the standard-bearers. This was taken Up to Eleven in 2016, when Donald Trump was compared to Goldwater as both were branded as extremists (both supported "states' rights", campaigned for a massive slash on the federal government and had controversial policies towards foreign nationsnote Goldwater was seen as being too hard on Russia, while Trump was seen as too soft) and thus "mentally unfit" for the Oval Office (regarding Trump, many psychologists broke a rule enacted after the 1964 campaign that prevented them from speaking about public figures they didn't personally examine), not to mention that in spite of their popular appeal, many prominent moderate Republicans expressed their distrust of their standard-bearer, which would ultimately have an important impact on the GOP. The great difference was that while Goldwater lost by one of the largest margins in American electoral history, Trump won the Electoral College, although he ended up losing the popular vote to great controversy.
      • The 1968 and 2016 elections were eerily similar: The year was marked by social turmoil and crippling political polarization. The Republican Party candidate, campaigning for "law and order", is nominated by letting his primary rivals implode or cannibalize themselves while the Democrats attempt to show an image of unity amid very visible cracks that end up breaking at the very worst momentnote In 2016 however, "convention violence" was mostly concentrated outside the GOP convention. There is more scorn than enthusiasm for the main candidates among the general public and the GOP candidate controversially wins this particularly uncertain "unpopularity contest" by appealing to disenchanted blue-collar voters and invoking the Supreme Court by pledging to appoint more conservative Justices.
    • The '70s: There are major social changes; a long, grueling war ends with Uncle Sam losing, the economy is underperforming and the government is embroiled in an espionage scandal. The president tries to undermine said scandal by firing the person investigating him, only to have it backfire on him by intensifying it. The U.S. government begins the decade warming up to China, while the second half of the decade has Washington trying to mend bridges with Moscow. The car industry suffers from quality control problems. A Republican president tries to improve relations with an East Asian communist country.
      • While the Watergate and NSA cases initially drew a big deal of comparisons, their aftermaths were drastically different: Watergate led to the resignation of Nixon and the whistle-blowers were hailed as heroes (or at least they were considered to have done it in the name of a greater good). Meanwhile, while Obama was briefly hit by the NSA scandal, its long-term impact was mostly negligible; in contrast, the whistle-blowers were ultimately branded as traitors (no less because many attempted to sell data to/seek refuge in countries openly hostile to the U.S. such as Russia and China).
    • The '80s: A conservative media figure vowing to "make America great again" becomes President following a controversial and widely unpopular Republican and a "dark horse" Democrat known for his strident idealism. The left is split between "hard left" and more moderate political positionsnote Unlike with Reagan, the left did not take Trump's election very well. A Tory woman known for being reserved in public is the U.K. Prime Minister. There is a move towards moral conservatism after years of hedonistic attitudes. A royal wedding is viewed by millions around the world. A magnitude 7 earthquake hits Mexico. Electronic Music becomes the soundtrack of the decade. A musician of Italian-American descent becomes the talk of the town through her outrageous outfits and her stance with the LGBT Fanbase. Big-budget films dominate Hollywood. New technology transforms television viewing and music listening habits. A small East Asian country becomes an economic and technological powerhouse. A Supreme Court nominee in the later part of the decade faces a challenge to his nomination over his conservative views.note Though Brett Kavanaugh's nomination was successful, in contrast to Robert Bork.
    • The '90s: Police brutality flares up racial tensions, leading to violent riots in some cases. Disney begins a huge Renaissance following a slump. A respected African-American celebrity sees his reputation go down the toilet. One of the most beloved leading men in Hollywood is a television star from the previous decade who gets a second chance at life after overcoming a major drug problem. Woody Allen is mired in scandal over his family. A cartoon that was intended for 6-11 female demographic, becomes a massive hit among the adult male demographic thanks to the talents of Lauren Faust and Tara Strong, helping establish a fledgling new network as a major player. The other franchise, meanwhile, has a much more poorly received show in the other decade. A powerful Category 5 hurricane strikes Florida. A deadly school shooting shocks the nation, and brings demand for gun control. Raves become major gatherings among the youth. A conservative Supreme Court nominee faces accusations of sexual assault/harassment before being ultimately confirmed but galvanizing the feminist movement.
    • Turn of the Millennium: The perceived lackluster Democratic Presidential candidate associated with the very popular outgoing president wins the popular vote but loses the electoral vote to the Republican candidate. There is a chaotic aftermath, with one president-elect seeing his victory in a month-long legal dispute and the other being denied the traditional "honeymoon" period from his opponents. A very popular Canadian musical act is the butt of pop culture jokes. A Disney-bred starlet hailing from The Deep South becomes an international pop sensation starting at the end of the previous decade only to be mired in numerous scandals at the middle of the decade before undergoing a Career Resurrection by the end of the decade. A relatively obscure high-fantasy novel series by a man with "R.R." in his name blasts into the mainstream in the second year of the decade with a massively popular screen adaptation starring Sean Bean. Disney Channel has a huge cartoon hit that launches in June of the "2" year. A major tragedy in a Virginia college town during the "7" year fuels national debate. A major hurricane catastrophically floods a Gulf Coast city.
    • Some historians argue that the world is returning to the status quo before the rise of the USSR after World War I, they note that many of the tensions in the Middle East, especially in Syria stem from the Sykes-Picot agreement, the dividing up of the Middle East after the downfall of the Ottoman Empire, with a "Belle Epoque" of America as the world's dominant superpower giving way to the emergence of a multi-polar world of various entities (America, EU, China, Russia, and potentially India). An early advocate of this view was historian Eric Hobsbawm who argued that the "Short Twentieth Century" of 70 years comprising the rise and fall of the USSR was an "Age of Extremes" and rapid change, but there has been growing agreement that the period of vertiginous change that marked the 19th and 20th centuries was unusual and would be followed by an era of more static development.
    • Many also consider that the fact the U.S. and U.K. are turning inwards is a signal that the English-speaking dominance of world politics that emerged after the Napoleonic Wars is withering, curiously replaced by the previously dominant Franco-German order that has revived as a revamped European Union regained traction after Brexit.
    • The Democratic Presidential Primary of 2016 turned out to have many rather striking parallels with the Presidential Election of 1824. One candidate was a former Secretary of State and an immediate relative of a former President, and was known for having an intimate knowledge of statecraft but also criticized for a perceived lack of popular appeal; the other was a fiery populist organizer known for his distrust of banks, his warnings about America's financial institutions growing too powerful, and his avid support for grassroots popular democracy over caucuses dominated by party insiders; the primary also became a source of controversy after the former Secretary of State won the nomination from the fiery populist, leading to a few allegations that the nomination was "stolen". By this point, the populist's supporters were less concerned about the Secretary of State winning than the fact that it could lead to someone they were far more afraid of taking power. Decide for yourself: are we talking about John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson (featuring Henry Clay), or about Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders (featuring Donald Trump)?
    • President's Barack Obama's warming of U.S.-Cuban diplomatic relations with the "Cuban Thaw" is comparable to the warming to diplomatic relations between United States and China with Richard Nixon where the U.S. tries to normalize diplomatic relations with a communist country that was historically hostile to the U.S. Ironically, Donald Trump not only has been less keen on it (eventually holding back on further policies), but his phone call to the Taiwanese president note The U.S. official stance in the China-Taiwan issue is very ambiguous. The U.S. government recognizes the Chinese government over the Taiwanese government. At the same time, the U.S. does not recognize China's sovereignty over Taiwan, and is willing to militarily back Taiwan should China attempts to invade Taiwan to claim sovereignty of Taiwan, thus potentially starting World War III. (in addition to his tweets blasting the Chinese government) is seen as attempts to reverse Nixon's legacy on China.
    • The souring of U.S.-Russian diplomatic relations under President Obamanote The U.S. and Russia supporting opposing sides on the Syrian Civil War, and the massively-decried Russian invasion of Crimea. was seen by many critics as the potential start of a 2nd Cold War. During Trump's campaign and early on in his presidency, this possibility now seemed highly unlikely, as Trump and Putin praised each other. Inversely, many were worried about U.S. entering a Cold War-style conflict with China, a country Trump labeled as a "currency manipulator". In the end, worries were reversed. Trump reversed his outlook on China, which eventually shut down fears of conflict. On Russia was confirmed to have influenced the 2016 election cycle, and also hacked the DNC and RNC, leaking emails of the former to the public. This caused the the American public to grow more suspicious of Putin. However, it was double subverted, with the trade war between United States and China after President Trump imposed tariffs on Chinese goods; combined with the North Korean nuclear missile crisis in 2017 and the South China sea territorial disputes this led to souring of diplomatic relations between United States and China. Conversely, the Trump administration established warmer relations with Russia while souring diplomatic relations with key U.S. allies with imposition of tariffs.
  • Hover Bike: This decade has seen the construction of the first working prototypes of "flying cars".
  • The Illuminati: Although the status of this organization remains elusive, the early years of the decade saw almost every single public figure and piece of pop culture being accused of being associated with them (often overlapping with The Reptilians) on the 'net, eventually leading to a resurgence of conspiracy theories in general among the wider public. And somehow, the "Illuminati symbol" gained meme status among the MLGnote Major League Gaming community by the middle of the decade (often paired with Doritos and Mountain Dew).
  • The Internet Is Serious Business: Social media has been scrutinized for causing the deep political divisions seen in the later part of the decade. How bad could it be? In 2016, a bot was designed to depict views on Twitter. Almost immediately, the bot began to "tweet" misogynistic and white supremacist thoughts and was put down after a few hours. Moreover, the allegations of Russian hackers meddling in elections in America and elsewhere has made cybersecurity a growing concern with both politicians and the public.
  • Job-Stealing Robot: Automation is a major cause for concern. It is the key reason for the disappearance of manufacturing jobs and it is a major cause for concern among politicians and economists, because it would not only lead to lower growth (as a service-based economy is far less productive than an industrial economy) and large-scale unemployment, but make the rich even more richer and the shrinking job market even more scarce, leading to calls for permanent universal income and other forms of social democracy to correct this situation.
  • Kid Com: Nickelodeon and Disney Channel are starting to air more kid comedies at the expense of animated shows. Cartoon Network has attempted to follow suit numerous times, but all efforts for the most part have failed.
  • Lens Flare: Started somewhere in the late 2000s, early 2010s visual media couldn't seem to go without a horizontal lens flare, probably popularized by the film, Star Trek (2009).
  • Little Sister Heroine: This trope has gotten a lot of backlash among western anime fans thanks to the controversial ending of Oreimo (the said little sister also happens to be a Tsundere, a character archetype that is incredibly loathed by the western anime fanbase). Several anime works try to remedy this featuring characters of this trope with a Nice Girl personality with a much younger age, but many works such as Black Bullet, Ro-Kyu-Bu, Here Comes the Three Angels, and Eromanga Sensei have gotten fierce criticism for various Unfortunate Implications involving underaged girls and many see them as a Lolicon fetish.
  • Live-Action Adaptation: Comic-book film adaptations have become immensely popular during this decade: Marvel solidified its position with the continuing X-Men Film Series along with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, which became fully established by TheAvengers in 2012, while lesser-known properties such as Guardians of the Galaxy, Ant-Man and Deadpool have become successful. DC Comics has followed suit with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Wonder Woman leading to a future saga of Justice League films. Even Disney is joining the bandwagon with their take on revamping its animated classics such as Maleficent, Cinderella, The Jungle Book and Beauty and the Beast.
  • Long Runner: Most popular TV shows from the first half of the decade actually began during the 2000's. It got to the point in which a show could be seen as pretty short-lived in case it didn't last five seasonsnote The average run of most primetime shows until the early 90s. The "long miniseries" format that became popular in cable and streaming could be seen as a reaction against the trope]].
  • Loot Boxes: After mostly being the domain of mobile or Allegedly Free Games in the 2000s, this form of microtransaction proliferated into the gaming mainstream during this decade and became a hotly criticized practice in the latter half. Publishers began implementing increasingly predatory and game-affecting lootbox systems into full-priced AAA-industry games, until the bubble burst dramatically with the release of Star Wars Battlefront II (2017); the Internet Backdraft against which was so loudnote (Among other things, a Reddit comment made by Electronic Arts to defend the game's use of lootboxes became the most downvoted comment in Reddit's history) that mainstream media and government officials took notice. The Belgium Gambling Commission officially ruled in April 2018 that loot boxes were a form of gambling prohibited under Belgium law, prompting numerous other countries to perform similar investigations.
  • Lurid Tales of Doom: The 2016 presidential election was marked by the emergence of heavily fictionalized, if not totally fake, news trying to defame either Trump or Clinton. Sites such as Breitbart and Russia Today have been the most notorious cases.
  • Manchild: Immature protagonists struggling to grow up were frequent comedy protagonists, particularly in works associated with Judd Apatow. Lena Dunham’s Girls proved that this wasn’t restricted to men. These uses of this trope fed media controversy, as newswriters writing about The Generation Gap tended to stereotype the Millennial generation as immature narcissists.
  • Medieval European Fantasy: The success of Game of Thrones has shown that this setting is still very popular. Games such as The Witcher 3 and The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim have been some of the most acclaimed of the decade with the latter being ported to a wide variety of systems.
  • Merchandise-Driven: Still fairly common, particularly with the "Bayformers" trilogy and shows on The Hub.
  • Mini Series: Returned as a credible genre after two decades. This revival has also sparked a trend for longer miniseries, some of them lasting an entire season (often dubbed as "limited series"). This in turn has created a slew of anthology series such as True Crime, American Horror Story and Fargo.
  • Moe: While it's been all the rage in the East and becoming a more popular concept in the West, reception of newer anime series that feature this (most notably in the West) tend to be treated with either indifference or outright disgust due to either being generic adaptations of Harem or Romantic Comedy, or put in an inappropriate setting. It also doesn't help to note that this trope is constantly being applied to females and is sometimes seen as sexist within among the Western fanbase. My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic has been extremely popular not only with its intended audience, but also with a large periphery demographic of older males and its Moe appeal has been commented on; the show is popular enough to have been exported back to Japan, and it has been cited as an example of rising interest in Moe in the West, albeit in its own style.
  • Monster Clown: Fall 2016 was marked by a number of so-called "clown sightings" in Europe and the U.S., where people would take to wandering the streets at night dressed as clowns. On the innocent end, most were just pranksters. On the sinister end, this has led to several reported attacks, as well as reported "clown-hunting" vigilantism.
  • Moral Guardians: Resurfaced early in the decade from both the left and the right in response to the perceived debauchery present in contemporary times, with "Blurred Lines" and double-standards becoming the most controversial cases. This increased lobbying power has in part contributed to the increased popularity and expansion of web-originated contents.
  • Must Have Caffeine: The 1990s/2000s-era fascination for coffee continued with the "third wave" coffeehouse movement popularizing cold brew and reviving the manual drip pour-over and the French press methods popular during the 90s. During the decade, consumption patterns shifted, as energy drinks (the non-athletic kinds hitherto stigmatized as drug-level deleterious) and some varieties of tea replaced "good ol' java" as the quintessential pick-me-up, spelling severe trouble for traditional brands such as Nescafe, Folgers and Maxwell House, while more gourmet-driven brands such as Starbucks and Nespresso have thrived.
  • Music of the 2010s: If the music trends of the 2000s catered to practically every kind of taste, this decade has been marked by the near-monolithic dominance of Electronic Music, which exploded in popularity in early 2012. Urban music, its only credible contender (having surpassed rock as America's most popular music genre in the mid-2010s) has incorporated electronic aspects to catch up, often crossing over as "featured artists" on EDM songs.
    • Auto-Tune: Began in The Turn of the Millennium, but hit its stride in 2010 with the "Bed Intruder" song, and made into an art form—seriously—by the likes of Bon Iver and Kanye West. Unfortunately for the music industry, such devices have caused many musicians to lose interest in the mainstream... for the most part, with British Indie Rock being the main exception. Its excessive use actually caused a bit of a backlash, with further usage being more for enhancement (and making fun of it in the web) rather for effects per se.
    • Dubstep: The focus of a pop music craze since 2011's "Party Rock Anthem". DJs such as Skrillex and hits like "I Can't Stop" and "I Knew You Were Trouble" increased its staying power throughout the middle of the decade.
    • House Music: Various styles of it have taken turns at the forefront of EDM's mainstream boom. Electro House and progressive house were there at the start, then big room house showed up for 2013, and in 2014, the commercial success of Disclosure brought deep house into the mix.
    • K Pop: Went global this decade, beginning with PSY's "Gangnam Style" becoming a hit worldwide. The second half of the 2010s saw the genre lead a wave of interest over Korean culture in a number of countries.
    • New Sound Album: Many artists have hopped to the genre beginning in 2013-14, some of them being known for having starkly different styles.
    • Pop Revival: British Indie Rock groups reminiscent of 1960s-era musicnote with some of them using analogue synths from the 1960s have become quite popular, especially among several rock fans, although many others have written the genre off as not being rock at all for being Lighter and Softer than the subgenres that dominated in the 2000s.
    • Synthpop: Returned to the mainstream with a minimalist New Wave-esque style taking over.
    • Trance: While not quite as commercially big as dubstep, house, or trap, trance has nevertheless experienced a massive Newbie Boom in the States and continues to maintain a very dedicated fandom all over the globe.
    • Trap Music: After being written off in The '90s as a hardcore variation of Hip-Hop, it saw a massive boom in popularity this decade when artists like Diplo, DJ Snake, Yellow Claw, Flosstradamus, Baauer, and Keys n Krates combined it with EDM. Despite having little in common with the original style of trap by borrowing from Latin genres, it has completely transformed into a form of mainstream music.
  • My Country Tis of Thee That I Sting: Criticism of one's country has become more prevalent in media during this decade, most notably in the U.S., where this was almost totally restricted to satirical and/or politically-charged works.
  • Nerd Glasses: No longer associated with social-awkwardness and/or ugliness, specs have actually been considered sexy in this decade.
  • Nerds Are Sexy: As intellectualism has risen in popularity, good-looking characters with good knowledge have become more common in media, while the ditzy types popular during the 2000s are likely to be frowned upon.
  • New Media Are Evil: Whereas in the 2000s, films, rock music, video games and Messenger/chatrooms were the main targets of moral outrage, the present decade has seen them turning their outrage on cable TV/streaming series and social media, although movies returned to the fold later in the decade for many of them.
  • New Technology Is Evil: During the second half of the decade, the humongous tech corporations drew fire from many fields because of their direct role on the plight of whole industries (Amazon over retail, Facebook over journalism, Netflix over television, Google over everything else, etc.). While they have long been attacked conservatives over the progressive politics of their leading figures and their heavy crackdowns on and deplatforming of right-wing content, it would be a series of scandals regarding the handling of personal data (primarily the use of Facebook data by an analysis firm to influence elections in the UK and the US) that would ultimately harm the left’s public perception of the men that were seen as "the heroes of the digital age" at the beginning of the decade.
  • Network Decay: Persists during this era, although some networks have started to return to their roots. Other networks have either shut down or re-branded entirely so at least their new themes fit.
  • Nice Guy: After being portrayed as "wide-eyed fools" for most of the 90s and 2000s, many works began to see this kind of character in a more sympathetic light, especially in works made during the first half of the decade.
  • Nice Hat: And by the way, it is not a fedora. It's a "Trilby" (a smaller variation of the fedora).
  • Nintendo Hard: After the difficulty drop in video games over the previous two decades, games with more of a challenge, such as Dark Souls, have gained a following.
  • No Dub for You: Becoming more prevalent as fewer English dubs are being produced for anime (though Funimation is still producing English dubs for almost all of their licensed shows).
    • However this trope seems to be getting less prevalent with Sentai Filmworks producing even more dubs than Funimation annually, Viz Media licensing and dubbing a larger variety of shows, Saban being back in the game, Aniplex USA dubbing a healthy portion of their shows, and the Japanese companies producing a few dubs themselves. Heck, even Media Blasters still dubs, despite being in financial ruin, and NIS America entered the game as well in 2014 with their English dub of Toradora!. 2009-2011 were somewhat dark years for the medium. The revival of Toonami and the introduction of the Neon Alley streaming service indicates there is some demand for English dubbed anime for a few select titles and this trope is often applied to more niche titles (i.e. Slice of Life Schoolgirl Series or Otaku-pandering anime).
  • Nostalgia Filter:
    • Nostalgia for the 1980s has not only led to a slew of reboots from successful icons and period pieces set in the era, but it has also brought a return of more conservative yet colorful fashions, as well as a renewed interest for punk-inspired outfits.
    • There has also been a wave of Victorian/Edwardian revivalism that no one expected, primarily for its aesthetic values and societal attitudes, becoming romanticized as an era devoid of the ills of modernity that came upon the Great Warnote not taking into account that most people did not live pastoral and pleasant lives as often thought, but more like in a tale of Dickens. But its most notorious manifestation has been the hipster-led revival of trades that had been eccentric pursuits for almost a century like butchers, barbers and brewers.
  • Obvious Beta: Due to games consoles now having online capability as standard, many video games from the decade (such as the notorious initial release of Assassin's Creed: Unity) are released with Game Breaking Bugs in them with companies opting to fix them later.
  • Obsessed with Food: Millennials have been noted for their pursuit of gourmet foods as well as the tendency to post pictures of what they're eating on social media.
  • One-Hit Wonder: There have been many over the course of the decade, but particularly decade-defining examples include Baauer, Ylvis, Gotye, Willow Smith, Foster The People, Cali Swag District, AWOLNATION, Icona Pop, A Great Big World, Passenger, Bastille, MAGIC!, Nico & Vinz, The Wanted, Mark Ronson, Elle King, OMI, James Newton Howard and Jennifer Lawrence, Hozier, and Silentonote these include five artists whose one hit topped the charts (Gotye, Baauer, MAGIC!, Ronson, and OMI); in the case of the latter four, it extended to being their only entry on the Hot 100, period (although a song Ronson was featured on scraped the bottom of the Hot 100 for a week, and OMI had another song "bubble under"). If the more liberal definition is applied, then Carly Rae Jepsen, Robin Thicke, Hot Chelle Rae, Far East Movement, Avicii, Rachel Platten, (who all technically had more than one hit) Kreayshawn, PSY and Rebecca Black (who didn't even chart on Billboard) are often cited. The Chainsmokers are often cited as an example of a miraculous escape from the status.
  • Painted-On Pants: Fashion in the first half of the decade placed a major emphasis on form-fitting clothing, as seen in the popularity of leggings for females and skinny jeans for both genders, a trend that might be permanent with the rise of "activewear" and other technologically-developed clothing. In the business world, slim-fit "Italian Look" suits also saw a revival in reaction to the large suits worn by pre-2008 Wall St. bankers or members of the Bush administration (for instance, the double-breasted blazer basically went extinct after 2010, returning in a small scale by the second half of the decade, same for ties over two inches wide).
  • Periphery Demographic: Several well known examples have emerged in popular culture during this decade, such as the Bronies.
  • Perma-Stubble: Some younger men have gone as far as implanting hair to have one of these (full-grown beards and mustaches are equally fashionable as well).
  • Playing Both Sides: Russian trolls in the later half of the decade used social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to create fake "alt-right", neo-Nazi, and white nationalists accounts to discredit leftist celebrities and politicians or to damage their reputations. At the same time, the same Russian trolls are also responsible for creating fake social media accounts to manipulate the Black Lives Matter movement in order to exacerbate the already fragile racial tensions in America note Although this part isn't the first time the Russians tried to use America's racial tensions as a tool against United States, the Soviet Union created socialist propaganda during the Cold War aimed for black Americans in regards to racial segregation in order to win support within the black community.
  • Plucky Girl: As the result of greater diversity behind the scenes and a more liberalized societal view, female protagonists with strong, assertive personalities have become popular in many works of fiction, as evident with the commercial success and critical acclaim of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic and Wonder Woman (2017) (the latter being directed by a female film director also helped as well). The popularity of this trope also caught on within the anime fandom as well, as many of Toonami's growing female audience can be attributed to anime featuring female protagonists of this character type (i.e. Attack on Titan, Michiko And Hatchin, and Kill la Kill). Coincidentally, this trope is part of the reason why there is also a backlash against many popular anime female character archetypes in the West (see Tsundere and Token Mini-Moe entries in this page) along with massive backlash on otome games.
  • Police Brutality: Growing attention to this topic led to more portrayals of police brutality in fiction, including several Ripped from the Headlines films such as Fruitvale Station.
  • Popularity Polynomial: Many trends of past decades have become popular again, particularly from The '80s, mostly because many artists were children during this time.
    • Aside from Synthpop, a few songs have hearkened back to other styles of the decade with considerable success: Meghan Trainor's debut single "All About that Bass" shot up to #1 (although the song has some 50s pop styles as well). Not long afterwards another throwback hit #1, "Uptown Funk!".
    • The Hipster craze also led a rediscovery of pre-hippie 60s culture, with "Mod" styles becoming popular. Smoking and social drinking have also become fashionable once again thanks to Mad Men (actually placating steep consumption declines), which in turn has led to a resurgence of the conservative mid-century social attitudes in general (although this really was not what the show's creators wanted) with some important changes nonetheless, and the rather libertine demeanor of the 1990s and 2000s is now frowned upon.
  • Pop-Up Texting: With technology and phone usership having increased dramatically, this is a popular trope for realistically showing the commonality of text conversations in 2010s day-to-day life.
  • Power Tattoo: Tattoos became even more popular, bolstered by the decade's trends for self-expression, with TV shows such as LA Ink becoming hugely influential. By the mid-to-late 2010s, polls showed that around two-thirds of young adults in several Western countries (including the U.S.) either had at least one tattoo, or planned to have one eventually. The fact that many high-profile celebrities began to sport tattoos has pretty much killed their long-standing association with disreputable characters.
  • Pretty Fly for a White Guy: The decade has seen a continued appropriationnote "appropriation" is being used very loosely to avoid saying "anti-globalization movement", not one where one culture misuses the elements of another, which is what cultural appropriation really is. of black urban culture into the mainstream. Ironically, black students were reportedly barred from a "wigger"note "white nigger" party held at a California high school.
  • Pronoun Trouble: Though still not completely accepted in the general public, the concept of the non-binary gender spectrum note  Simply put: the idea that there are near-infinite genders other than "male" and "female", and that people can be neither gender, or several genders at once, or completely gender-less. A good example of this trope is South Asia's hijra, which is similar to concept of transgender. has gained much more attention, with its proponents becoming something of a Vocal Minority. The most hardline supporters of the idea have come to support (among other things) the idea that the world's languages should add gender-neutral pronouns, that genders are assigned to children at birth in a practice which parents should stop, that it's a form of bigotry to refer to strangers by gender-specific pronouns, and that biological sex (and even species) is a myth.
    • This trope is subject to a big issue for many transgender individuals, as many of them are often misgendered by pronoun and name (often deliberately by many conservatives in order to discredit the person's identity; with the latter case referred as "deadnaming", or referring to a transgender's person birth name rather than the name that they identify with) on basis of biological sex rather than the gender they identify with in regards to job application, I.D. cards, and even bathroom access (as stipulated by the "bathroom bill" laws enacted in a number of states).
  • Protection from Editors:
    • A lot of the appeal of premium cable and streaming services like Netflix and Hulu to both creators and viewers is the greater creative freedom compared to network and basic cable television.
    • Subverted with YouTube as after popular vlogger PewDiePie made a series of tasteless jokes about blacks and Jews on a number of livestreams, advertisers and "corporate partners" began turning away from the site, especially as it turned out that their ads were featured beside videos actually promoting white supremacy and Islamic fundamentalism among other kinds of "hate speech". YT then enacted new rules to allow uploaders to monetize their videos with a censorship code not different from American network/basic cable TV.
  • "Rashomon"-Style: By the second half of the decade, left-wing and right-wing media have largely portrayed two completely different narratives for the same events, which fueled into the growing distrust between the two sides and with media as a whole.
    • For example, the riots in Charlottesville were portrayed by liberal-leaning media as a Curb-Stomp Battle by white supremacists against local counter-protesters and by conservative-leaning media as a clash between the supremacists and antifa that were two sides of the same coin. Alt-right media, however portrayed the supremacists as victims who were force-fed by local politicians (and according to some, the police) into a group of far-left communists.
    • The investigation into the Russian hacking, while treated as a serious scandal by left-wing media, was portrayed by the right-wing as a witch hunt motivated by revenge over Hillary Clinton’s defeat.
  • Raven Hair, Ivory Skin: Gradually coming back into style as a beauty standard, in contrast to the previous decade's fondness for Golden Hair and Bronze Skin. New sex symbols like Zooey Deschanel, Dita Von Teese and Katy Perry have helped resurrect the old "Bettie Page" look.
  • Reality TV: Kicked off in popularity during the Turn of the Millennium and has grown to become all the rage among television audiences when it comes to both ratings and media buzz during the decade, with American Idol, The X Factor, and Jersey Shore, among other titles leading the way. Although, barely counting competition-based reality shows, shows such as the "day in the life" ones have been targets of Snark Bait due to them being catered to the Lowest Common Denominator.
  • Real Women Have Curves: Due to the success of celebrities like Adele, Meghan Trainor (whose song "All About That Bass" touched on the topic), Jennifer Lawrence, Sofía Vergara, Kim Kardashian and Christina Hendricks, as well the rising rates of eating disorders from Hollywood's warped perceptions, the dominant pressure of The '90s and the Turn of the Millennium to be skinny is steadily getting replaced with pressure to be curvy.
  • Reconstruction: Many works have put a lot of effort to do this after about 15-20 years of Darker and Edgier deconstructions.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Publicly shaming people accused of bigoted opinions on social media has become part of a "call-out culture" that has surged during the latter part of the decade.
  • Retraux: "Retro-ironic" aesthetics have become very popular during the decade, partly as a result of the success of video games emphasizing this kind of imagery.
  • Romanticism Versus Enlightenment: Dominant cultural attitudes of the decade are out-and-out for Team Enlightenment, although a Romantic-leaning backlash is anything but small.
  • Saved from Development Hell: invoked Among the silver-linings, a number of long-gestating projects are finally making it to the finish line:
    • The Last Guardian by Team Ico was dismissed by many as a cancelled title until Sony announced the title in 2015, and the game finally released in December 2016 to everyone's relief and surprise.
    • Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, formerly considered the most cursed production ever, went into production and completed shooting, all set for a 2018 release. Likewise, Martin Scorsese's Silence which was 26 years in the making, finally released in 2016. David Lynch managed to reunite most of the cast for Twin Peaks for an acclaimed third season that satisfyingly resolved a lot of the subplots of the second season and while it provided more unanswered questions, ending on a Gainax Ending that most fans considered to be a fitting conclusion for a landmark TV show.
    • The king of this, is Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind. The film was shot in The '70s and was finally set for release four decades later, and over three decades after Welles' death, on Netflix, with many joking that Orson Welles is the only director to still put out new films after his death, and that Netflix is possibly the best producer Welles ever had.
    • After spending years languishing in development hell due to fears of the Girl-Show Ghetto and Minority Show Ghetto, the Wonder Woman and Black Panther movies were finally made and released in this decade and were smash hits.
    • On the videogame front, Duke Nukem Forever, which had been in development for over a decade, finally released in 2011 to disappointing reviews.
  • The Scapegoat: The Millennial generation has been held responsible for "killing" numerous industries and traditions ad nauseum (it would be easier to list those that are not endangered). Boomers have also been accused by younger generations of milking the welfare state dry and of developing a laissez-faire "got mine, get yours" attitude. Many people on both sides of the political spectrum also tend to blame many of the world's problems on extremists of the opposite side.
  • Screamo Music: While not as big as it used to be in the previous decade, bands like Pierce The Veil, Sleeping With Sirens, the Black Veil Brides, Escape the Fate and Bring Me the Horizon are keeping the screamo genre alive.
  • Sequel Gap:
    • Due in part to Hollywood's growing aversion to untested properties, sequels to movies from previous decades are becoming common. Examples include Toy Story 3 being released 11 years after the second one, Men in Black 3 10 years after the second, TRON: Legacy a whopping 28 years after TRON, and Mad Max: Fury Road twenty-nine years after Thunderdome. In addition, Monsters, Inc. got a prequel 12 years after the original release. And then there's Twin Peaks by David Lynch which was more or less written off by Lynch as finished in the 2000s but was revived in a successful and critically acclaimed third season that has a Time Skip echoing the whopping 25-year gap. Finding Dory and Incredibles 2 are two more examples of film sequels with large gaps in time in between with 13 years for the former and 14 years for the latter.
    • It's been happening with a number of video game franchises as well, with Wasteland 2 being a notable example with a gap of 26 years.
  • Serious Business: Popular entertainment has increasingly reflected contemporary social issues in the wake of Trump's election, primarily for him being seen as a threat to civil liberties and multiculturalism, but also the fact many voted for Donald as a way of "flipping the bird" at a seemingly progressive cultural establishment.
    • Late night comedy has gotten more political, and went from nonpartisan to explicitly pro-Democratic, as evidenced by the anti-Trump stance of Saturday Night Live which garnered its best ratings in over 20 years (it also began to be broadcast live coast-to-coast in summer 2017), and the politically-themed The Late Show with Stephen Colbert overtaking Jimmy Fallon's largely apolitical The Tonight Show in the ratings in early 2017, being accused of "humanizing" Mr. Trump by tussling his hair during a show, leading Fallon to issue an on-air apology. Fallon has occasionally spoken out on watershed political events like Charlottesville and Parkland, although he was still considered weaker in that regard than his peers. The cancellation of the hit sitcom Last Man Standing was also perceived to have been brought about because of star Tim Allen's conservative politics.note Notably, Allen has frequently criticized Trump even after his election and in fact endorsed the moderate John Kasich during the Republican primary.
    • Awards ceremonies have gotten more politically charged, beginning with the 2015 Latin Grammys (awarded a few weeks after Trump launched his campaign attacking Mexican immigrants) and accelerated after Trump's election, to the point of presenting works as "political protests" in order to win awards. Even youth-oriented awards shows like the Teen Choice Awards (whose 2017 ceremony was held the day after the violent protests in Charlottesville) and the Kids Choice Awards (whose 2018 ceremony took place the day of the March for our Lives protest) got in on the act. In addition, the 2017-18 awards season was marked by the sex scandals that have hit the film, television and music industries. Many celebrities, who previously have tried to be very quiet about their politics beyond showing support for some associations linked to either party, have been more explicit about those beliefs than before.
    • The 30-year-old tradition of sports champions visiting the White House was broken when a handful of players for the New England Patriots refused to visit Trump, while the Golden State Warriors decided to boycott the President altogether (although he had withdrawn his invitation beforehand), a move supported by the NBA.
    • Most magazines, from Vogue to Esquire to Seventeen to Sports Illustrated and Popular Mechanics, rarely did political commentary before 2016, much less reporting. Afterwards, their coverage of Washington has become as comprehensive and in-depth as that done by fully-fledged political periodicals such as Time, Newsweek and The Atlantic.
    • Even video games as a medium aren't immune to politics, as many video games such as Far Cry 5, the later Call of Duty games, Mass Effect, Persona 5, Fallout, and Bethesda's Wolfenstein games have several political undertones or explored incredibly controversial political themes. The only entertainment medium that mostly avoided politics is anime and manga, but this is mainly because Japanese society is far less politicized than in the West—while Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is quite polarizing by Japanese standards, he's far less divisive than any Western leader, and anime and manga that explores political themes are incredibly rare (with Subbing vs. Dubbing and piracy are the only Serious Business topics within the anime fandom).
    • Even the traditionally-conservative country music industry has been rocked hard by Hollywood's "progressive awakening". During the late 2000s and early 2010s, country music increasingly made inroads in "blue America" thanks to popular "countrypolitan"/pop crossover acts like Taylor Swift and Carrie Underwood, while the GOP's allegedly sexist, anti-gay, and anti-immigrant politics has led some of the genre's youngest (especially female) fans in "red states" to lean more like their "city cousins". The rise of Trump, the growing frequency of mass shootings (one of which was actually at a country music festival), the post-Parkland shooting student activism, the violent rally in Charlottesville, #MeToo, and the 2018 migrant crisis has contributed to the de-emphasizing of the "jingoistic, gun-toting, "Stainless Banner"-drapednote A nickname for the Confederate flag white male country singer" while the Dixie Chicks and the Guthries had their prestige restored after spending the 2000s in the "country blacklist" for their left-wing politics. Leading the charge for this trends tend to be alt-country acts and many of the women in the industry, with the conservative, more traditional acts becoming increasingly quiet about their political views (the exception being the artists who solely appeal to older audiences). This has largely been cited as a reason as to why Swift has been mostly silent on politics.
  • Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll: This decade has seen a discrediting of the trope within the rock genre due to numerous factors, including: 1) The decline of rock as a mainstream genre; 2) the backlash against the "macho" aura often associated with the genre (which might have contributed to the first point); and 3) younger "indie" artists adopting a goodie-two-shoes, "square demeanour" (most of them being either British or coached by a Brit, inverting the British Rock Star trope) contrasting the "guitar hero sex god" stance of hard rock (actually a mild exaggeration). The trope may apply to pop and urban (the "trap" genre becoming known for its sexually-charged lyrics and has caught fire for its perceived glorification of crime, while hip-hop/R&B artist The Weeknd becoming noted for his veiled allusions to drugs), although the greater demographic diversity between both performers and audiences compared to rock (which is now almost exclusively seen as "white trash guy" music) has made the trope less relevant for said genres.
  • Sex Sells: While sexuality has gotten much more toned down compared to the last twenty years, seeing female pop musicians not being promoted through sexually charged imagery seems to be something of a rarity in this decade. Although hardly a new phenomenon, moves towards Hotter and Sexier public personas starting with Miley Cyrus (a particularly raunchy example, until she radically changed her image again later in the decade) have led artists to "outshock" themselves...
  • Shaking the Rump: "Twerking" has become more viral in the hip hop culture, and was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online. Newfound popularity on social media sites like Vine and Miley Cyrus' infamous performance at the 2013 VMAs helped turn "twerk" into a household word.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Along with She Cleans Up Nicely; the decade's fashion statements have tried to bring back the elegance lost with the 90s and 00s, evoking the styles from The '80s, or the "Italian Look" styles of the late 1950s and the 1960s.
  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: The plight of soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan lacking proper mental health support has gotten a lot of attention.
  • Shoulders of Doom: Shoulder pads have made a wide comeback, bolstered by an urge to look as streamlined as possible.
  • Silly Rabbit, Cynicism Is for Losers!: Much of the social attitudes of the early part of this decade can be summed to this, mostly as a reaction to the hardcore cynicism prevalent in the 2000s, leading to a higher climate of tolerance (or intolerance disguised as tolerance, even tolerance defended through intolerance—this depending on your judgement) and thorough avoidance of politically-incorrect, morally-questionable actions or otherwise upsetting behavior.
  • Simple, yet Opulent:
    • As a result of the crisis, most of the fashion trends of the decade have become a lot more conservative compared to the statements of the last decade.
    • While Windows Metro caused a mixed reception when it was released in 2013; graphic artists, programmers, and web designers got hooked to the smooth, crisp, über-simplistic interface, paving way for Apple and Google to revamp their future UIs, and it led to the integration of the "Flat Design" style.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism: Works tended toward the cynical side during this time, with a surge in dystopian and After the End works. The rise of Hipster culture was accompanied by media emphasizing Irony, making idealism uncool. At the same time, cynicism didn’t quite reach the level of '90s Anti-Hero, as most works still featured characters that were on some level relatable.
  • Sliding Scale of Libertarianism and Authoritarianism: Many works made during the decade have depicted oppressive governments firmly set at the "authoritarian" end of the scale, mostly (but not only) in dystopian tales.
  • Solar Punk: The trope name was coined in 2014, and this utopian futurism emerged from a exciting developments in renewable energy technology and online interest in older and non-Western art. Some works with utopian elements, such as Black Panther, began to incorporate this aesthetic.
  • Soul-Sucking Retail Job: With the disappearance of manufacturing jobs in the developed world, the standard "blue-collar" job has become some kind of fast-food or service position in retail or hospitality with lower pay and fewer opportunities for advancement rather than a job in a factory.
  • Steam Punk: Regained popularity in the States after a decade of dieselpunk/decopunk, cyberpunk and atompunk dominating the Speculative Fiction and Alternate History scenes. Unlike in the 1990s however, steampunk also became popular in the mainstream.
  • Strawman U: Colleges have been increasingly perceived as being extremely hostile to conservatives.
  • Stylistic Suck: An essential element of a lot of online content, especially memes. This may have started as a parody of unintentionally bad online content (poorly-written forum posts, Fan Fiction, or amateurish Web Comics), and its rise coincided with the surge of Irony in pop culture. The ubiquitous "LOLCats" meme, the anecdotal Rage Comics, and the intentionally confusing "YouTube Poops" are prominent early examples of this, while later in the decade, "shitposting", or deliberately stupid/poorly executed content, became a prominent source of Surreal Humor.
  • Subbing vs. Dubbing: This trope became Serious Business in the early decade when many anime licensors such as Bandai Entertainment and Geneon closed their doors and English dubs became less prevalent early in the decade due to the stagnating market. This trope become more of a Discredited Trope in the later decade, as there has been some revival of English dubs thanks to the revival of Toonami, introduction to simuldubs in the later half of the decade (which was an initiative started by Funimation), and improved dubbing quality in the later half of the decade when compared to the previous two decades.
  • Supernatural Soap Opera: The genre became dominated by Young Adult Paranormal Romances and Urban Fantasy early in the decade before becoming more eclectic as in the 1990s. The genre's most successful examples have been Teen Wolf, Shadowhunters, Riverdale, Hemlock Grove, American Horror Story, The Shannara Chronicles, Once Upon a Time and True Blood.
  • Surreal Humor: Has become popular this decade, with Tim & Eric, Rick and Morty, "Weird Twitter", and "shitposting" among others.
  • Survival Horror: Received a resurgence early in the decade, thanks to video games like Amnesia: The Dark Descent, Slender, and Outlast.
  • Survival Sandbox: After the success of Minecraft and DayZ, we saw many games coming out in their ilk in the early-mid Tens, like State of Decay, Rust, Don't Starve, and H1Z1.
  • Tamer and Chaster: The general tone of pop culture during the decade has taken a turn away from the raunchiness that marked the late 1990s and 2000s.
  • Teen Idol: Male teen idols have seen a massive resurgence in the 2010s, although many groups formed in the 2000s. However, instead of the competitive scene of the 90s and 00s, only Justin Bieber and One Direction (and the group's solo careers) have reached a massive level of popularity. Austin Mahone, Shawn Mendes, and 5 Seconds of Summer have had some moderate success, but not at the same level as the former two. For female teen idols, Miley Cyrus, Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato, Ariana Grande, Fifth Harmony, and Little Mix have led the way.
  • Thin-Line Animation: Animated shows of the period have been noted for using this aesthetic instead of the 1950s-based Thick-Line Animation style that dominated in the late 1990s and 2000s.
  • Token Mini-Moe: This character archetype is still relatively popular in Japan, but much like the tsundere archetype, this has gotten massive backlash among western anime fans and even some of the top anime producers in Japan itself due to the Little Sister Heroine fetish and Unfortunate Implications involved.
  • Tokyo Rose: It turned out that Russian trolls and bots had been planting social media posts intended to influence American votes in the 2016 elections.
  • Totally Radical: Pressure to keep relevant has led many companies to shoehorn internet slang and memes in their advertising to appeal to the youth. Needless to say, it falls flat on its face.

    "Marketing targeted at today's youth is so strange because like, they've picked up on certain things, but they can't quite string the parts together in a cohesive way. It's like one of those shitpost generators. I mean, yeah, they understand that reaction gifs are a thing, and they understand that emojis are a thing, and they understand that tyler oakley (sic) is a thing. but they can't drive the point home. that is not a proper reaction to finding the right emoji. it doesn't make sense, and not even in a funny way. they're trying, really hard, but the nuances of internet youth culture still manage to escape their corporate grasp."

  • Trademark Favorite Food:
    • When discussing the economic status of Millennials, expect avocado toast, Nutella, and/or Starbucks to be brought up.
    • In the 'net, conversations aren't completely full without mentioning bacon in every thread, to the point that This Very Wiki used to have trope page about bacon.
  • True Companions: It has always been around, but a lot of work on this decade has bonds and friendships as its Central Theme, and Heterosexual Life-Partners starting to become increasingly prominent. Even in real life, friendship is now more cherished by a lot of people around this time.
  • Tsundere: The concept is still strong, but it has gained a bit of a backlash in this decade, mostly due to the combination of oversaturation, poor writing and Flanderization of the Tsun-Tsun traits for comedy's sake. The subtrope of Shana Clone has undergone a similar criticism for a few of the same reasons. Ironically, male tsunderes haven't received much backlash like female tsunderes do, though this may have something to do with the fact that most male tsunderes rarely abusive towards their love interest as much as their female counterparts.
  • Twice-Told Tale: Exploded in popularity in this period, in the wake of 2009's novel Pride and Prejudice and Zombies in literature and 2010's film Alice in Wonderland (2010). The former launched the Literary Mash-Ups genre, and the latter a raft of Fairy Tale retellings.
  • Two Decades Behind: In spite of being a seemingly more difficult time than the 1990s and 2000s, the 2010s have been remarkably similar to the previous two decades in many sociocultural terms.
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: After the heavy anti-intellectualism that marked pop culture in the 2000s, many of the works of this decade have made extensive use of cultural references, some of them quite obscure.
  • Western Animation of the 2010s: The decade may as well be called the "Second-Wave" Renaissance due to a resurgence of good-quality animation after mostly spending the second half of the decade in a slump, especially for Disney with the release of highly-successful films; Pixar reaching its artistic zenith, falling into a rut and redeeming itself in the space of five years, before doing it all over again over two years; and Cartoon Network phasing out the Canadian imports and live-action shows it introduced in the late 2000s, replacing them with cartoons aimed at a young adult audience like Regular Show and Adventure Time.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Cartoon Network's shows of the first half of the decade like Regular Show and Adventure Time became notable for their prominent use of adult situations to the point these saw important edits for overseas broadcast. By the mid-to-late 2010s, the use of this trope by films aimed to families (to the point Deadpool made it very clear that it was an R-rated film) became used as a counterpoint to claims that Hollywood has become "infantilized" during the decade.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: Both amateur and professional critics love to read sociopolitical significance into everything: movies, TV shows, video games, music videos and internet memes, given the growth of social consciousness and the increasing politicizing of fiction in the wake of Brexit and Trump's inauguration (see "Serious Business" above). The only entertainment medium that mostly avoided this trope is anime and manga, which is mainly because the politicization of pop culture is mostly more noticeable in the West than in Japan.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Surrealist and non-sequitur situations Played for Laughs became popular through the later years of the decade, particularly among the younger set.
  • Why Fandom Can't Have Nice Things: Has become increasingly common during this decade following the rise of social media. There have been several incidents of angry fans harassing people who work on the show or franchise they follow off of social media, causing them to limit interactions with fans and even effecting the work they're developing, with fans' dissatisfaction often tied with a work being too politicized, not politicized enough or taking what they consider the "wrong" side.
  • Why We Are Bummed Communism Fell:
    • A subtle wave of nostalgia for the Soviet Union as a Worthy Opponent, some of it unhealthy or hypocritical, surged among some Western intellectuals lamenting the rise of Islamic Fundamentalism as the West's Arch-Enemy instead of a secular revolutionary ideology.
    • Legitimate social democratic alternatives were once on the mainstream with occasional bi-partisan consensus. These goals were originally backed, even by moderates and conservatives because they felt that reforms could dial away the appeals of Communism but fell into disfavor in the '80s and '90s and the collapse of the Soviet Union made liberals move away from it, feeling that revolution was no longer a significant threat to justify these policies in terms of political expediency. Such policies returned to the limelight in the wake of the Great Recession, as in the case of Bernie Sanders and Jeremy Corbyn, with Sanders becoming the first high-profile socialist candidate since Eugene Debs ran in a handful of elections in the early 20th century, and Corbyn brought back hard-left ideas to the Labour party.

      Noam Chomsky: Now, in the current American political spectrum, to be a New Dealer is to be way out on the left. Eisenhower, for example, who said anyone who questions the New Deal doesn't belong in the political system, would be regarded as a raving leftist. So Bernie Sanders is a decent, honest New Dealer.

  • Women Are Delicate: Constantly defied as empowered, yet still lady-like female characters have sprung up.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: Dyeing one's hair in unorthodox colors (most notably gray and blue) has become an interesting trend. It's caught on among older people too, as Helen Mirren decided to dye her hair pink on a whim - inspiring quite a few more as noted here.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: Very popular, especially during the first half of the decade, thanks to countless video games as well as films and shows like Zombieland, The Walking Dead, 28 Weeks Later, among others.

Examples of Media set in this decade:

    Unclear/Several years 

Literature
  • Infinite Jest: David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest takes place 20 Minutes into the Future relative to the early-to-mid 1990s and is surmised by most to take place in 2010 give or take a year or two (although one theory puts it 2015), but since numbered years have been abolished to make way for years named after the corporate sponsor who pays for the naming rights, nobody can tell for sure.
  • The first update of the Web Serial Novel Worm is set on April 8th, 2011 — the first 19 arcs take place before the end of June, and the story then timeskips to 2013.

Video Games

  • The modern day portion of Assassin's Creed takes place in the 2010s.
  • The events of Undertale takes place in the year 201X.
  • The Touhou series from Ten Desires onward has taken place in the 2010s.
  • Kentucky Route Zero is set in the height of the Great Recession, envisioning it as a new time of Southern Gothic.
  • killer7 takes place in the first half of the decade, most chapters between 2010 (Angel on January 30th, Sunset on February 10th) and 2011 (Cloudman on April 3rd, Encounter on August 10th, Alter Ego on October 26th, and Smile on December 16th), with the finale, Lion, skipping ahead to an unspecified day in 2014.
  • Ace Combat 6: Fires of Liberation's Emmeria-Estovakia War takes place from August 2015 to March 2016.

     2010 

Anime & Manga

Films

  • 2010: The Year We Make Contact is set in 2010.
  • In Back to the Future, Doc Brown originally planned to travel 25 years into the future, October 26, 2010, before being interrupted by disgruntled Libyan terrorists.note Meanwhile, in Real Life, a Photoshopped picture of the DeLorean's control panel was passed around the Internet on July 5, 2010 (the 25th anniversary of the movie's premiere), suggesting that "we are the future." However, the film was set in October 1985, and Doc said that he wanted to see "who wins the next 25 World Series", making a trip to July sub-optimal.
  • District 9, a Science Fiction Mockumentary/Satire/Social Statement, set in 2010 South Africa.

Literature

  • In 2010, the advent of unlimited storage space and bandwidth will kill Big Media, according to Peter F. Hamilton's Misspent Youth.
  • Numbers begins in the last months of 2010.

Live-Action TV

  • The third season of Fargo is set in 2010, right around the Christmas season.

Music

  • Tim Wilson's "Jetpack" song, where he complains that the new millennium is not what he expected to be.

Video Games

  • Deer Hunter
  • The first four .hack games are set in 2010.
  • Uplink starts in this year.
  • The Boston scenario in SimCity is set in 2010. The nuclear meltdown fortunately never happened.
  • Fruit Ninja
  • The first Psychic Force game is set in the year 2010; its sequel takes places two years later.
  • Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War takes place in the back part of 2010, starting around September and ending at the morning hours of December 31st.

Western Animation

Web Comics

     2011 

Anime & Manga

Fan Works

Literature

Live-Action TV

Web Comics

  • Act 6 of Homestuck takes place on 11/11/2011.

Web Original

  • Pact starts on August 11, 2013.
  • Stuart Hardy. He originally joined in 2011 on YouTube, though didn't start video reviews until 2012.

Video Games

     2012 

Anime & Manga

  • Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches starts in May 2012 (confirmed by a calendar and a Time Travel chapter even though the narration in the first chapter, released in February 2012, claims that the story took place "not too long ago").

Comic Books

Films

Fan Works

Literature

Live-Action TV

Video Games

Real Life

Other

     2013 

     2014 

Anime & Manga

Comic Books

Fan Works

Live-Action TV

Video Games

     2015 

Anime & Manga
  • The Future GPX Cyber Formula series begins in 2015, and continues on to 2022.
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion begins in 2015, and may extend into early 2016. Instrumentality happens between December 31, 2015 and January 1, 2016. What happens after that isn't certain.

Literature

  • Eden Green (and the extradimensional disaster it covers) takes place in late July, 2015. The author also released a free web serial, City on the Edge of Nowhere, to recap events with bonus 2015 context.

Fan Works

Films

  • Back to the Future Part II is partly set on October 21, 2015.
    • In Real Life July 2010, many people fell for a hoax confusing this date with the film's 25th anniversary (July 3, 2010); see that year's section for details.
    • Towards the end of the original movie, Doc traveled to October 26, 2015, and after learning about the circumstances of Marty McFly Jr.'s arrest, travels back to 1985 to take Marty and Jennifer to 2015, kick-starting the second film.
    • The film infamously predicted that the Chicago Cubs would sweep the 2015 World Series. Sadly, the Cubs were swept by the New York Mets in the National League Championship Series... on October 21, 2015. However, the Cubs would finally win the World Series the following year in 2016. The film series' Twitter account joked that the discrepancy of the Chicago Cubs winning the World Series a year early was due to the film's version of 2015 being in a universe where the 1994 baseball strike never occurred.

Podcasts

Video Games

Web Original

  • Ward takes place in 2015.

     2016 

Films
  • In Ghostbusters II, one of the guests on Peter Venkman's show "World of the Psychic" predicts that the end of the world would happen on February 14, 2016.

    Venkman: Valentine's Day. Bummer.

  • Assassin's Creed (2016) is set in 2016, with Templar Ellen Kaye outright stating the year.

Western Animation

Video Games

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 and 3 are set in 2016, 5 years after the first game, though the final mission of the latter game extends out to late January of 2017.
  • The Ace Attorney series is for the most part set in this decade, with the first game starting off in the fall of 2016.
  • Persona 5 says it's set in 20XX, but uses the same calendar dates as 2016.

     2017 

Comic Books

Films

  • A part of Click takes place in 2017.
  • The majority of Terminator Genisys take place in 2017.

Literature

  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: The epilogue of the last Harry Potter book (published in 2007) would, according to the official timeline, take place in 2017. We don't really get to see what the Muggle world is like by that time, but at the very least they still have cars and driving tests. We also know that they still have train stations and that they haven't found out about wizards yet.

Video Games

     2018 

Film

Video Games

     2019 

Anime and Manga

Films

Literature

  • Arthur C Clarke's July 20, 2019 is set on... that's right. (He chose that date because it's the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.)

Live-Action TV

Music

Video Games

  • House of the Dead III takes place in 2019.
  • It is implied that the Varrigan City Death Watch in MadWorld takes place in 2019.
  • Cases 3 and 5 of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney: Trials And Tribulations take place on this year. Also, the Side-Trial of Case 4 on Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney where Phoenix is disbarred happens on April 29th (almost three months after Case 5 of T&T).

Works made during the 2010s

    Animated Shows 

    Asian Animation 

    Han-guk Manhwa Aenimeisyeon 

    Light Novels 

    Newspaper Comics 

  • Big Nate continued its run through the decade.
  • Bloom County returned in 2015 after a 25-year absence.
  • Dogs of C-Kennel, started syndication in 2010.
  • Dustin, started in 2010.
  • Phoebe and Her Unicorn, started as a webcomic in 2013 and became a syndicated strip in 2015.

    Puppet Shows 

    Radio 

  • Ask Me Another
  • SBS Pop Asia
  • True Capitalist Radio: Ghost already started his broadcasting career in 2008, but troll raids in the show didn't become regular until late 2009 and the show didn't gain a lot of popularity or transform to its current format as a combination of Political Talk Show and Sitcom until summer 2011. Additionally most of the episodes were made during 2011-2012 and 2016 time frame.



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